Town of Lamoine, Maine

 

COMPREHENSIVE

PLAN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN COMMITTEE

 

Joan Bragdon

Donald Cooper

Steven Gabel-Richards

Margaret Hill

Charles Major, Chairman

Mary Ann Orzel

Anne Stocking

 

Adopted March 5, 1996

As entered from the original plan, April 2000


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

COMMUNITY DESCRIPTION.. 1

PART I        INTRODUCTION.. 1

A. LAMOINE LAND USE BASICS. 1

B.   A SHORT HISTORY OF LAMOINE.. 3

C.    ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES. 5

PART II DEMOGRAPHICS. 6

A. POPULATION TRENDS. 6

C.    AGE CHANGES. 9

D.    INMIGRANT INFORMATION.. 10

PART III      LAND USAGE. 15

A. SOILS AND GEOLOGY. 15

B.     LAND AND SOIL MAPPING.. 19

C.        THE LAMOINE AQUIFER. 19

D.    HOUSING.. 19

F.     LAND USAGE IN THE COMMUNITY. 24

G.    NON-RESIDENTIAL LAND USAGE.. 27

PART IV  TRANSPORTATION.. 30

A. HIGHWAY FACTS. 30

B. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION.. 30

C. HIGHWAY TRANSPORTATION.. 30

D.  AIR TRANSPORTATION.. 34

PART V.      PUBLIC FACILITIES AND SERVICES. 34

A. WATER SUPPLY. 34

B.  ENERGY FACILITIES. 34

C.  SEWAGE FACILITIES. 34

D.  SOLID WASTE.. 34

E.  PUBLIC SAFETY. 35

F.  COMMUNICATIONS. 35

G.  HEALTH CARE.. 35

H.  CULTURE.. 36

I.  RECREATION.. 36

J.  CEMETERIES. 37

PART VI  NATURAL RESOURCES. 37

A.  GENERAL INFORMATION.. 37

B.  DEER AND BEAR POPULATION.. 38

C.  WILDLIFE HABITAT. 38

D.  LOCAL MARINE WATER QUALITY. 39

E.  LOCAL WATER TESTING.. 42

PART VII  BUSINESS, COMMERCE AND LABOR.. 42

A.  GENERAL SURVEY. 42

B.  DAY CARE AVAILABILITY. 43

PART VIII  GENERAL ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICES. 43

A.  INTRODUCTION.. 43

B.  FISCAL SUMMARY. 44

C.  TOWN SCHOOL-FISCAL INTERFACE.. 44

D.  EXISTING ORDINANCES. 44

PART IX       EDUCATION.. 45

POLICIES AND POLICY IMPLEMENTATION RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COMMITTEE   46

1.     ORDERLY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. 46

A.  Lot Sizes. 46

2.  POPULATION GROWTH.. 50

3.  PUBLIC FACILITIES*. 50

4.  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. 50

5.   SAFE AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING.. 51

6.  WATER RESOURCES. 51

7  CRITICAL NATURAL RESOURCES. 52

8.  MARINE RESOURCES. 52

9.  AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST RESOURCES. 53

10. HISTORIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES. 53

11.  OUTDOOR RECREATION.. 54

12  COASTAL POLICIES. 54

13.  CAPITAL INVESTMENT. 55

14  SOCIAL WELFARE. 56

15.  GENERAL TOWN GOVERNMENT. 56

16. EDUCATION.. 56

APPENDICES. 58

APPENDIX 1. 59

School Population Predictions. 59

APPENDIX 2. 63

HOUSING NEED ANALYSIS. 63

APPENDIX 3. 64

A.  INVERTEBRATES OF LAMOINE BEACH.. 64

B.  BIRDS OF LAMOINE.. 68

APPENDIX 4. 70

HOUSEHOLD SURVEY—TOWN OF LAMOINE—91. 70

RESULTS B. 76

ADDENDUM #1     UPDATE TO INVENTORY DATA.. 81

1.  EDUCATION ENROLLMENT. 81

2.  FISCAL UPDATE TO 1993. 82

 

 

 

 


 

COMMUNITY DESCRIPTION

 

PART I    INTRODUCTION

 

 

            Lamoine is a small coastal community, a bedroom town with a conspicuous retirement component, at the head of Frenchman Bay in Hancock County.  It is almost exclusively residential.  Industrial activity is minor and consists primarily of gravel extraction and some small, marine-related activities.  Agriculture consists of a few large hay fields and a couple of small blueberry fields.

            There is no business district.  There are no formal stores of any type.  There are a few at-home businesses and some local contractors who operate from small yards.  Shopping is done in Ellsworth, the nearest town, and Bangor, the regional hub, thirty miles away.

 

A. LAMOINE LAND USE BASICS

 

TOTAL AREA

12,853 ACRES

20.08 SQ. MILES

TOTAL LAND MASS

12,783 ACRES

19.97 SQ. MILES

BOG/SWAMP

250 ACRES

.39 SQ. MILES

FLOODPLAIN

236 ACRES

.38 SQ. MILES

INLAND WATERS – BLUNT’S POND

 

70 ACRES

 

.11 SQ. MILES

LENGTH OF SHORELINE

 

28.25 MILES

 

 

      The current population (1990 Preliminary Census Report) is 1,311, the highest in the community’s history.  Historically the local population has varied substantially.

      The community has a significant summer population surge with a probable summer peak of around 2000 people.  The difference between the January and the July figure is even sharper as many householders, usually retirees, spend three weeks to three months in sunnier climes.


 


 

B.   A SHORT HISTORY OF LAMOINE

 

 

Josephine Cooper, President

Lamoine Historical Society

 

      Lamoine’s first permanent Caucasian settlers arrived in the 1760s.  In pre-historic times, Native Americans inhabited the area year round.  There is still some evidence of Indian shell heaps along the shore in Lamoine, although there has been substantial erosion.  After the appearance of the white men in the area, the Native Americans began migrating inland during the winter months. 

      Lamoine was originally included within a much larger township.  This township, which came to be called Trenton, covered an area from Card’s Brook in Ellsworth to Hancock (then a part of Sullivan)

      The attraction for both the Native Americans and the early settlers was the coastline.  Lamoine’s many coves and inlets made for ideal harbors.  Fish and clams were plentiful.  During the first half of the 1800’s, Lamoine was a major shipbuilding area.  There were over sixty vessels built here, the peak years of production being reached before the Civil War, in the 1840’s.

      The vessels built were primarily two-masted schooners, used for fishing and hauling freight along the coast, and to and from the Caribbean.  Residents supported themselves by fishing or farming.  There were other businesses supporting the shipping industry as well; logging, blacksmithing, carpentry, and general stores.

      Most of the larger shipyards and fishing wharves were located along the Jordan River and there were several stores there.  Some physical evidence remains of the many piers that were there.  However, ships were built all around the shores of Lamoine: Raccoon Cove, Berry’s Cove, and even at the site of the present cemetery at Lamoine Corner.

      There never was any one town center in Lamoine, but rather a collection of village areas.  These all corresponded to the original shipbuilding and fishing centers.  At Lamoine Corner, where the Grange Hall and Baptist Church are now, there was the largest cluster of buildings, including a two-storied Grange Hall with a store on its ground floor, a post office, the church, the Lamoine High School (where the present elementary school is now), and the Town Hall.  There was an elementary school not far down the shore road.

      Other village areas can be identified by their post offices:  East Lamoine, North Lamoine, Marlboro, and Lamoine Beach.  These areas lost their post offices when Rural Free Delivery came to Lamoine in 1904.  The school population declined in the 1930’s and then rose again, and by the 1940’s the town had the current school plan. 

      The roads, originally, were secondary tracks between houses and villages.  Most of the roads were approximately where they are now.  The biggest exception was the north end of Route 184.  What is now Route 184 went to Ellsworth by a different route.  It went out what is now the MacQuinn Asphalt Plant road and on to Ellsworth by way of Washington Junction.  The main road to Ellsworth was the current Buttermilk Road.  Most travel in early Lamoine was by boat, and roads were incidental. 

      Fishing was the major industry in Lamoine until the end of the 1800’s.  Schooners sailed to the Grand Banks during the summer months, usually with a crew of three to six men, and stayed until their holds were filled with salted fish.  The cod and herring were brought back to be dried along the Jordan River, then shipped to the Boston Market. Lamoine’s fisheries were second only in importance to those of Lubec during these years. 

      The Civil War disrupted the economy of the area.  Shipbuilding continued until the 1880’s but never again reached the peak production of the 1840’s.  After the war, there was an economic boom during which time the fishing industry flourished, but, as the railroads took over most of the haulage of freight, the coastwise shipping trade declined.

      In 1870, Lamoine separated from Trenton and was incorporated as a town.  It was named after an early resident, Andre LeMoyne.  The Marlboro section of the town remained a part of Hancock until 1933.  The population reached a peak in 1880 with over 800 people, but it began to decline thereafter, reaching a low point in the 1920s and 1930s.  As shipping and fishing disappeared, the Lamoine economy suffered.  Many residents in the late 1880’s migrated to Massachusetts for employment in the textile mills or as carpenters or went West.  There were some attempts to promote Lamoine as a summer resort, hoping to raise property values and provide seasonal employment to the residents, but the developers met with no success.  Plans to bring the railroad to Lamoine were also unsuccessful.

      Hopes for the town’s economy were raised when the U.S. Navy chose Lamoine as the site for a coaling station for its ships, located at the site of the current State Park. The station was completed in 1902, but was only in operation for a short while.  Oil was already replacing coal as the major fuel used by the Navy.  During World War I, the station was used for the storage of nitrates, used in making explosives.  After that, much of the Station was dismantled for scrap.  In the 1930’s the University of Maine acquired some of the buildings for a biological laboratory.  It became a State Park in the 1950’s.

      Around the turn of the century, ice was an important product, being harvested at Blunt’s Pond and shipped to Boston.  There was also a large sardine cannery located at Lamoine Beach at this time and another smaller one at the mouth of the Skillings River at Marlboro.  Neither seem to have been in operation very long.  There were also two hotels in Lamoine around this time.  One was Shore Acres at Lamoine Beach; the other was the Gault Hotel, located where the State Park is now.

      The coast remained Lamoine’s greatest asset but now it was because of its scenic beauty.  The population of summer residents grew, particularly after World War II.  Many former residents who had had to move elsewhere to find employment continued to maintain summer homes here.  Between the wars, many Lamoine families supported themselves with some farming and with seasonal work in neighboring resort towns, particularly Bar Harbor.

      World War II brought a major change to the landscape of Lamoine as gravel pits were dug all over the town to provide gravel to build the airport in Trenton.  It was not the first time gravel had been dug and sold in Lamoine; in the 1800’s there was a gravel operation near Berry’s Cove and another along the Jordan River that shipped gravel by boat.  Today gravel operations have replaced fishing as Lamoine’s major natural resource industry.

 

C.      ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES

 

      The Maine Historic Preservation Commission lists six numbered prehistoric archaeological sites in Lamoine.  All are coastal shell middens.  With the exception of Site 43-4, the Boynton Site at Old Point, none have been scientifically surveyed.

      The Commission has designated most of the shore of Lamoine as “archaeologically sensitive,” with the exceptions of Raccoon and Partridge Coves, part of Berry Cove, and the upper reaches of the Jordan River.  A mechanism for review of construction activity in these areas should be set up.  The one site in Lamoine on which material has actually been published is the Boynton Site.  It was first excavated in 1913 by Warren K. Moorehead, then director of the Robert S. Peabody Museum in Andover, Massachusetts.  It was again dug in 1916 by George G. Heye of the Museum of the American Indian (now a part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.), and in 1948 by Wendell Hadlock and Douglas Byers of the Robert Abbe Museum of Bar Harbor, Maine.  The most recent digging at the Boynton Site was in 1983 by a group of Ellsworth High School students.  There was also been extensive casual and unrecorded digging at the site.

      When Morehead began his work on the site, he estimated the Boynton Site at about 300 meters by 150 meters with depths of a meter and a half, making it one of the larger sites on the Maine coast.

      Moorehead’s excavations indicated two or possible three periods of prehistoric occupation and yielded about 5,000 artifacts, including bone points, fish hooks, and harpoons; chipped stone points and knives; ground stone tools; pottery; and small numbers of copper and slate artifacts.  Heye found the same type of material taking 2,200 artifacts from the site.  Byers and Hadlock found an additional 500 objects.  No firm evidence of a habitation site has been found.

      Currently, the artifacts and field notes from the Byers and Hadlock expedition are held at the Abbe Museum where they have been catalogued but not yet accessioned.  Moorehead’s material, including field notes and a number of photographs, are at the Peabody Museum at Andover, Massachusetts.  Local Research could not locate the Heye material but it may be at the Smithsonian or in the Heye Collection at the University of Pennsylvania.

      Archaeologists do not currently recommend any further research at the Boynton shell heap due to the extensive amount of work already done, and the quantity and duration of amateur diggings and “pot hunting” at the site.

 


 

PART II DEMOGRAPHICS

 

A. POPULATION TRENDS

 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

            The Lamoine population is expected to continue its growth and any long range planning must start with this basic factor.  The increase in population from 1970 to 1980 was about 57% and from 1980 to 1990 was 37.5% per decade.  If you examine these figures closely, you would note the 1980-90 percentage increase of 37.5% represented an increase of 358 people, and the increase in the preceding decade represented an increase of 338 people, so the addition of 358, the most recent gain per decade, might be a more conservative approach to predicting future growth.  We have used both a percent change based on the last decade, and an increment approach, adding 358 people per decade to predict future population.

 


 

 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

            Since there is a considerable difference by the two methods, the population must be closely followed over the next decade to see which method of prediction is the better.

 

            While the population of Lamoine has exceeded predictions, rising by 37.6% over the last decade, this change is not due to local births exceeding deaths.  This factor would account for only 11% of the increase so there has been an in-migration of over three hundred people.  The most recent data on the age distribution shows the pattern compared to the county and state data.

 


B.      AGE DISTRIBUTION    LAMOINE  1990**

 

AGE GROUP  LAMOINE                              HANCOCK CTY       STATE OF MAINE

 

Number

%

Number

%

Number

%

Under 5 years

85

6.5

3,205

6.8

85,722

7.0

5-17 years

239

18.2

8,130

17.3

223,280

18.2

18-20 years

37

2.8

1,881

4.0

56,232

4.6

21-24 years

43

3.3

2,270

4.8

67,540

5.5

25-44 years

440

33.6

14,906

31.8

398,580

32.5

45-54 years

168

12.8

4,899

10.4

124,751

10.2

55-59 years

82

6.3

2,180

4.6

54,216

4.4

60-64 years

59

4.5

2,322

4.9

54,234

4.4

65-74 years

90

6.9

3,835

8.2

91,600

7.5

75-85 years

54

4.1

2,435

5.2

53,547

4.4

over 85 years

14

1.1

885

1.9

18,226

1.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total population

1,311

 

46,948

 

1,227,928

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Median age

36.7

 

35.8

 

33.9

 

 

**FROM THE 1990 CENSUS DATA

 

The Lamoine population profile indicates that the community is comparable to the county except for a shortfall of almost 3% in the young adult group (18-24 years old) and an excess of 4% among older age groups (45-59 years old).  Compared to state-wide figures the pattern is the same.  There is a shortage of young adults and a population peak shift toward the 45-59 age group.


 

C.      AGE CHANGES

 

 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

            From this table, one can see the changing distribution among age groups.  Note that the 18-65 age group, whose percentage of the population dropped from 1940 to 1970, has been growing for the last twenty years.  The trend will probably continue and the over 65-year group show an increase, as this spills over with time.

 

            The community survey conducted in 1991, hereafter, simply called “the Survey”, shows the type of family grouping currently providing the growth impetus.  Respondents placed themselves into the categories and this information, taken with the census data, indicates that a continuance of the existing inmigrant patterns will lead to an increase in the average age in the Lamoine population mixture and that there will be more 45-65 year olds in the next decade.


 

D.                INMIGRANT INFORMATION

 

 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

            This data also indicates that the future school population will probably lag behind the total population increase.  This means that school planning for the future will have to be conservative for the next decade or until the ratio of the school population/total population becomes more clearly established.  The need for social services for the elderly may, conversely, increase more rapidly than casually anticipated.  This trend may turn out to be ameliorated by the socio-economic cross section entering the community whose capacity to move may indicate greater than average financial resources.


(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

CHART DATA FROM 1991 SURVEY

 

            It is clear that a major reason for choosing Lamoine for a new home is its rural coastal character.  Financial considerations were often a factor.  Family ties in the area were also important in bringing people back to the town.

            The graph below shows the origins of the people moving into Lamoine.  The largest group of new residents comes from Mt. Desert and other surrounding towns but another part of the recent influx is from out of state.

            While it is obvious that the physical attributes of the town are the dominant attraction for people entering the community, many of these newcomers are moving from towns of similar attractiveness.  Fifty-two percent of these people are merely changing towns within the Hancock County and Washington county area, and two thirds of these are from within Hancock County, itself.


 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

CHART DATA FROM 1991 SURVEY

 

            There must be an additional factor and so one must either presume that Lamoine’s locale is more convenient to where these people work, or economic factors, which were cited by 25% of respondents as being a consideration, were important in the choice.  Some 35% of our new residents came from out of state, many of them being retirees or near retirees, and these may have been looking for an area with affordable housing.  This may be a factor in our growth.

            Since some twenty percent move here from Mount Desert Island which has an acute housing shortage, we should be aware of any large-scale projects there which would decrease movement into Lamoine.  Ellsworth is continually adding housing so the number entering Lamoine from there is probably already in some type of equilibrium.

 

E.                HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS  **

 

 

NUMBER

PERCENT

Households

501

100%

Family Households

380

76% of all households

   Married Couple-Families

328

65% of all households

86% of Family Households

   Single Parent, Female

42

8% of all households

11% of Family Households

   Single Parent, Male

10

2% of all households

3% of Family Households

Non Family Households

121

24% of all

   Living Alone

96

19% of all households

79% of non-family Households

      Living Alone-over 65

44

9% of all households

46% of Living Alone

Living Alone – Over 65

 

 

             Female

33

7% of all Households

34% of Living Alone

75% of Living Alone over 65

            Male

11

2% of all Households

11% of Living Alone

25% of Living Alone over 65

 

 

Lamoine

Hancock County

State of Maine

Persons Per Household

2.62

2.48

2.56

Persons Per Family

2.97

2.94

3.03

** Chart Data from 1990 Census

 

 

 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 


            There are no institutional groupings in Lamoine.  There are a significant number of single parent households and day care availability is usually more pressing within this group.  With current trends towards both parents in two-parent households working, child care facilities in the community should be encouraged and their cost and availability monitored.

            Lamoine is developing a significant population of elderly people who are living alone, almost a tenth of our households, and the community is almost totally lacking in an infrastructure to deal with this.  In the past, we have depended heavily on this group having strong family support elsewhere in the area and have relied on neighbors relaying the problems to the relatives.

            When there was no family support, our town officers handled emergencies on an ad hoc basis.  Ongoing problems were, normally, referred to the appropriate state agency.  With our local government totally part-time, this is an awkward procedure if the state agency does not pick up the problem and there are few, if any, routine channels to make the Lamoine Selectmen aware of the continuance of a local need for monitoring the problem.

 

F.      POPULATION OF LAMOINE BY SEX AND ETHNIC STATUS       **

 

CHARACTERISTIC

NUMBER

%

Females

678

51.7

Males

633

48.3

 

 

 

White

1302

99.3

Black

0

0.0

Native American

7

0.5

Asian/Pacific Islander

1

0.1

Other

1

0.1

Hispanic Origin

10

1.0

 

** Chart Data from 1990 Census

 

                        ANCESTRY-LAMOINE*

 

GROUP

PERCENT

GROUP

PERCENT

English

28

French

1

German

2

Greek

<1

Irish

10

Italian

1

Norwegian

1

Russian

<1

Scottish

3

Other

2

 

16% reported being a mixture of two groups and 25% of three groups from the list above.  9% did not get recorded.

*Chart Data from 1980 Census

 

 

BIRTH LOCALE*

 

State of Maine

72%

Other States

25%

Other than USA

3%

* Chart Data from 1980 Census

 

            The local population is a relatively homogeneous group and is almost exclusively of northern European origin showing a considerable mix of all these elements.  Three-quarters of the residents were born in Maine.  This distribution is similar to that found in earlier censuses.

 

 

PART III LAND USAGE

 

 

A. SOILS AND GEOLOGY

 

The soils and geology of Lamoine have been extensively catalogued.  The Maine Agricultural Experiment Station used the community for a pilot study to demonstrate soil study data usage.  The result was SOIL POTENTIAL RATING FOR LOCAL LAND USE PLANNING AT A LOCAL LEVEL IN MAINE, Bulletin 747, 1977, 141 pages, the booklet being totally devoted to the soils of Lamoine.  A copy of this analysis is kept in the Town Office.  In addition, in 1983, the Planning Board commissioned a study of the principal sand and gravel aquifer of the town through a grant from Maine’s Coastal Program whose funding was derived from the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Office of Coastal Zone Management.  This study was done for Lamoine by Robert G. Gerber, Inc., Consulting Engineers & Geologists of South Harpswell Maine and the study contains some 50 pages of data on the hydrological characteristics of the community.

Most of the community has soils that are unsuited for simple septic systems unless compensated for soil permeability, with immediate site filling to compensate for drainage, depth to bedrock, and rooting depths, in accordance with the Maine State Plumbing Code.  Some areas cannot be compensated in this manner.  The map on the next page shows the areas that can be made suitable in white and unsuitable areas are shown shaded.  Contractors working in the town should be advised of the necessity to reinforce trench walls during work and to provide adequate drainage for foundations.

Lamoine consists, principally, of various types of glacial, marine and stream sediments.  The town’s surface gradually slopes up from the sea, rising to its highest point of slightly over 300 feet on Beckwith Hill in the northwestern part of town.  More than half of the town, though, is less than 100 feet high.  Besides the Beckwith rise, there are three other ridges of glacial till and supporting bedrock: one running northwest from the western side of Berry Cove, a second running north-northwest from Marlboro, and a third starting from Lamoine State Park with Blunt’s Pond in its middle.  Sand and gravel is deposited on top of the till and bedrock and represents glacial eskers left some ten to thirteen thousand years ago when the glaciers retreated.  These sand and gravel deposits are the principal aquifers of the town.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note:  This map is the original from the Soil Potential Report, not the original contained in the Comprehensive Plan, but the information is identical.

 

 

 

            The four distinct types of surface deposits are shown on the map following page 15.  The principal aquifer is in the sand and gravel of the beaded eskers and submarine fans of glacial stream deposits.  There are several raised beach deposits (Qb).  These mantle wave cut terraces are made up of medium to coarse sand.  The glacial till in Lamoine is a mixture of sand, silt, clay, and gravel (Qt).  The fourth type of deposit is a blanket of massive to thinly laminated glaciomarine silts and clays of the Presumpscot Formation which underlies much of the town (Qp).  See the geology appendix for further details of these soils. 

            There are numerous springs in the town; the most well known are Latona Spring in East Lamoine and Cold Spring, the water source for about fifty users at Lamoine Corners.  The only true surface water in Lamoine is Blunt’s Pond, essentially a water table pond with no true surface outlet. 

 

B.      LAND AND SOIL MAPPING

 

            Lamoine was the pilot town in a Maine Agricultural Experiment Station project and the soils were classified and mapped in 1977 and are reported in their Bulletin 747 entitled SOIL POTENTIAL RATING FOR LAND USE PLANNING AT A LOCAL LEVEL IN MAINE. The only copies now in existence are those kept in the Lamoine Town Office and these should not leave this locale.  In addition the Frenchman Bay Conservancy had a contract to provide a consistent set of GIS maps to the communities littoral to the bay and this project was completed in late 1991.

 

C.      THE LAMOINE AQUIFER

 

            The dark contour lines on the aquifer map show the position of the average ground water table position and the rate and direction of the ground water flow.  The map shows the assumed boundaries of the aquifer, contained on its sides by less permeable glaciomarine soils.  The water table is recharged by precipitation.  Water level table represent a balance between this precipitation and the rate at which water can leak out through the “leaky” boundaries of the confining soils.  A ground water high is in the vicinity of Blunt’s Pond with a ridge extending northwest to a ground water low in the esker near the Town Hall.  Cold Spring is in this ridge.  Basically ground water flow can be determined for any point on this map since the flow will be at right angles to the ground water contours.  Leached solute from the town landfill will eventually flow toward the northwest corner of Berry Cove.

            There is a second gravel deposit and presumed aquifer around the gravel pit area to the interior from Seal Point Road.  This has not been analyzed.

 

D.      HOUSING

 

            Lamoine is almost exclusively a residential community with medium and low-cost housing and a scattering of more expensive housing.  Mobile homes are 13% of the local housing.  There is one Mobile Home Park that is mainly in Hancock.  Only three of the mobile homes in this park are in Lamoine.

 

STRUCTURAL AND VACANCY CHARACTERISTICS**

 

LAMOINE

 

Total Housing Units

692

Units in Structure

 

1 Unit, Detached

569

1 Unit, Attached

12

2-4 Units

20

Mobile Homes

91

 

 

Mean Number of Rooms

5.9

 

 

Occupied Units

501

 

 

Units with 1 or more persons per room

12

 

 

Vacant Units

191

Seasonal

146

Non-Seasonal

45#

 

 

Homeowner Vacancy Rate

1.9##

Rental Vacancy Rate

5.5###

 

# Includes rentals, houses for sale unoccupied

##For Sale, vacants, divided by total homeowner occupancy

### Vacant rentals/total rental units

**Data from 1990 Census

 

            In 1990, Lamoine housing units totaled 692.  Of the 692 units, 501, or 72%, were occupied and 146, or 21%, were seasonal units.  There were 45 vacancies, 6% of the total units.  The vacant units represented rentals and houses for sale.  Of the year-round housing, 88% were single-family housing units.  There were 86, or 12% renter-occupied units.

            The 1980 Federal Census indicated that local housing was 86% single family, 13% mobile homes, and 1% duplex units.  Clearly 99% of local housing is single-family occupancy. To date, development has consisted, almost exclusively, of subdivision for single occupancy type residence.  While a large amount of land has changed hands in the last few years, and rumors of condos and time-shares have been constant, there has been only one multi-unit apartment house with only four units actually constructed.

           

 

 

 

 

 

The growth of new housing units since 1980 shows a definite pattern of increase in single family and mobile home units, single-family units growing the fastest.  Multiple occupancy units grew briefly, 1986-89, but the construction of these has stopped during the current recession.  The graph below shows these changes and is corrected for loss of units through fire or demolition in each year.

 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).


 

            The quality of the housing in the community is periodically reviewed by the assessors and updated by them whenever state law requires a reassessment and whenever a building permit has been issued within the tax year.  Seasonal homes are often converted to year round use.

 

(Table is an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

4.                     OWNER OCCUPIED HOUSING

 

            It is clear that most housing in the community is owner occupied and the following tables provide the most recent data on such housing.

 

a.       Comparative Data

 

Category

Lamoine

Hancock County

Maine

Total Units

415

13,876

327,888

Single/Duplex

343

11,637

268,922

Persons/Unit

2.7

2.6

2.7

Mean # of Rooms

5.9

5.9

6.1

 

 

 

 

b.      Housing financial data from Census Sampling, 1990

 

Category

Lamoine

Hancock County

State of Maine

Total Subunits in sample

222

8,552

214,663

Values in Dollars

 

 

 

Under 50,000

25

1,535

37,489

50-99,999

122

3,894

95,187

100-149,999

39

1,573

49,286

150-199,999

16

718

18,040

200-299,999

9

517

9,995

Above 300,000

11

315

4,666

 

 

 

 

Lower Quartile*

66,200

58,700

60,100

Median

86,800

85,200

87,400

Upper Quartile**

123,200

126,300

123,300

 

*top of lower quartile

** bottom of upper quartile

 

For a housing need analysis see appendix 2

 

5.                                          FOOD STAMP DATA HANCOCK CTY-ELLSWORTH AMERICAN DECEMBER 12, 1991 SECT. 2, P 9.

 

Category

Lamoine

Hancock Cty

Washington Cty

State of Maine

Households with Stamps

18

1,333

2,536

51,912

Percent of Households

3.6

7.3

19.1

11.2

Number of People

38

3,092

6,068

118,362

Percent of People

2.9

6.8

17.1

9.9

Average Household Size

2.1

2.3

2.4

2.4

 

The food stamp data would tend to confirm the economic data shown in the housing and migration information.  Either the town is somewhat better off than the generality of the county and state or we have a communication problem, presumably with our elderly population, as to aid availability.

 

 

 

 

 

F.                LAND USAGE IN THE COMMUNITY

 

            According to the surveys conducted over the past five years, the feeling of the town is to keep the community’s character approximately the same as it is at this time.  This plan, therefore, will consider the wishes of the town while trying to meet the directives of the state.

 

SURVEY DATA

 

            The following are abstracted, by various subsets, from the 1987 and 1991 Surveys and indicates some aspects of the community’s feelings.

 

PERCENT ENCOURAGING HOUSING TYPE USAGE INDICATED (1987)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Located

 

 

All People

Year Round Residents

Summer Only

Land Owners

Renters

Shore

Interior

Single

95

95

97

95

100

97

84

Duplex

30

31

26

29

45

30

29

Apts

19

19

15

19

27

18

20

Elderly

63

62

78

62

55

60

65

Condos

13

11

23

21

18

16

12

 

PERCENT FAVORING VARIOUS LAND USAGES (1987)

 

LAND OWNERS HOLDING

 

Renters

0-1 Acre

1-5 Acres

6-25 Acres

25+ Acres

Single

100

96

95

93

93

Duplex

45

20

31

36

27

Apts

27

11

21

19

20

Elderly

55

73

62

68

50

Condos

18

14

11

15

13

 


The following graphs were derived from the 1991 Survey

(The graphs are approximations from the graphs contained in the original comprehensive plan)

 

 



 

            The surveys indicate that the townspeople would encourage single family residences, duplexes, individual mobile homes on privately owned lots, and housing for the elderly.  The data indicate that this ranking is held uniformly across all subgroups in the sample and has been consistent over time.

 

G.      NON-RESIDENTIAL LAND USAGE

 

            Heavy industrial uses were not encouraged in either survey.  However, small businesses such as convenience stores, shellfish processing activities, agricultural and forestry oriented usages, professional offices, and nursing homes had considerable support.

            The town survey indicates shore access, wildlife habitats, steep slopes, scenic and historic areas, and groundwater supplies should be protected.

            Soil studies of this area show Lamoine to be a very wet area with clay or sandy soil types not lending themselves to extensive heavy construction.  The opinion of the town seems to be to keep the town primarily residential with any light development kept as high on the peninsula as is feasible.

            The Village area to Blunt’s Pond appears to have the most suitable soils for residential housing according to the Soil Potential Rating Study.  Small sections of North 184 and Marlboro are also quite acceptable.  Most of the rest of the community is not rated very suitable for development.  Soils are either too porous or too wet and building without suitable construction precautions can be a problem.  New septic systems, in general, must be somewhat modified if they are to meet the State codes.  Some areas are too swampy to meet the State codes and are unbuildable under current rules.

 

 (Tables are an approximation based on the table in the original version of the Comprehensive Plan).

 

 

 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR HANCOCK COUNTY

 

            The following table represents what the Office of Comprehensive Planning considers affordable housing rents and selling prices for communities in Hancock County.

 

 

Affordable*
Income Range

Monthly Rent

Selling Prices

Very Low

Up to $250

Up to $23,500

Low

Up to $460

Up to $42,800

Moderate

Up to $890

Up to $83,900

 

*These figures include utilities, insurances, down payment rates, mortgage interest rates, and tax rates.

            The following table compares the average sales price for homes in Lamoine and Hancock County and are derived from the Real Estate Transfer Tax Combined Residential Sale Information for Hancock County, 1990.

 

AVERAGE SALES PRICE FOR HOMES IN LAMOINE/HANCOCK CTY

 

 

Lamoine

Hancock County

1986

$64,411

$61,461

1987

$64,525

$72,268

1988

$81,309

$91,603

 

            This chart shows that Lamoine does not seem to have a problem with affordable housing.  The average sales price for housing in Lamoine is below the average moderate affordable sales price for Hancock County.  This is only a crude statistic and does not show the degree of ‘affordability’ available at the bottom of the range for low-income households.  The survey data would seem to confirm some degree of affordability as a substantial number of newcomers indicated economic reasons for their choice of Lamoine for residency.  These newcomers may not be from the low-income side of the scale and so these responses may be biased by economic class.

            Though the housing in Lamoine is presently adequate, it is recommended that the community set up a permanent housing committee who will keep informed of the following:

 

1)      Federal and state grants available in the area of housing;

2)      Landbank approaches the town may use to make property available for elderly housing units, retirement homes or villages, nursing homes or recreational facilities;

3)      The housing needs in the community, taking into consideration the population pressures, natural resources, and the needs of the town.

 

The committee should make suitable recommendations to the town to meet any developing housing problems in the public or private sector.

The town should also consider the granting of tax credits to encourage private developments that would serve the town’s needs but, of course, only where such development rigidly meets all local codes.  The landbank concept should also be considered to encourage tree farming, forestry development, and blueberry land development, if applicable.

 

PART IV  TRANSPORTATION

 

A. HIGHWAY FACTS

 

State Highways

8.36 Miles

State Aid

7.31 Miles

Town Maintained

16.27 Miles

Total

31.94 Miles

 

 

B. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

 

 

Once a day service was provided to and from Ellsworth, through the Downeast Transportation Service until 1991.  This service was discontinued after the town withdrew its subsidy.

 

 

C. HIGHWAY TRANSPORTATION

 

1.                                 GENERAL VIEW

            The transportation system of a town is often a major determinant of growth and the pattern of development.  However, the existing system is only the product of past demands for personal mobility and the movement of goods, and may not provide adequately for present or future demands.  Though the present highway network was not “designed” with the “future” in mind, a careful assessment of Lamoine’s present system is vital if a proper evaluation of future demands is to be made for planning purposes.

            At present the predominant traffic flow in the town is between the town and Ellsworth and Mount Desert Island.  There is, too, a sizable flow using Route 204 and the Mud Creek Road as a shortcut between Route 3 (to Mount Desert Island) and Route 1 (to Downeast).

            A major component of traffic originating in Lamoine is generated by the local gravel pit operations.  This traffic reaches its peak volume during the construction season, running continuously from sunrise to sunset.  There is some additional gravel haulage from pits located outside of Lamoine and hauling to MDI from Downeast.  It is also apparent that the roads servicing the major pits are periodically in poor condition, suggesting a need for these to be reconstructed to a higher standard than at present or to be resurfaced more often.  When local pit operators secure state contracts for road sand, local operations pick up before winter storms as the state rebuilds its roadside piles in anticipation of demand.  There is some local feeling about gravel operations and comments on this subject comprised the most common complaint in the survey.  The Town has recently revised its Gravel Ordinance and added some restrictions.

            The roads in Lamoine can be classified as through roads:  the Rte. 204-Mud Creek combination which bisects the town; entry roads, upper Rte 184 and the Buttermilk Road; distribution roads, lower Rte 184, Mill Road, Walker Road, Asa’s Lane, and lower Rte 204.  Most other roads are terminal local delivery streets.  The traffic flow is greatest on the through and entry roads and traffic accidents reflect this traffic density.  Where these roads intersect is where the highest accident rate is found, 184/204 at the Town Hall, 204/Mud Creek Rd, and 204/Buttermilk Rd.  The first two have visibility problems that should be addressed in future state highway planning, the most urgent probably being the intersections at the Town Hall.  A professional traffic analyst should examine these intersections.  Other accidents are usually winter single-car accidents at curves but there is some evidence that speed contributes, especially on Buttermilk and upper Rte 184.  The following table represents data from the DOT for the period from Jan. 1989 to Jan. 1992.

 

Primary Cause

Single Vehicle

Multi

Total

Road Conditions

21

2

23

Driver

10

14

24

Other

4

1

5

Total

35

17

52

 

Some general observations may be made:

a)      Most accidents (67%) are single vehicle.

b)      Approximately equal numbers have road conditions (ice, snow, slush, rain, and fog) as driver factors (speed, inattention, and distraction) as contributing causes.

c)      Of the 35 single vehicle accidents, 21 (60%) list road conditions as the contributing factor.  These accidents may represent, in part, a group of overly optimistic drivers who venture out into weather conditions beyond their or anyone’s abilities, and who blame road conditions rather than their own poor judgment.  The fact that many of us have done this and gotten away with it does not mean our judgment was good.

 

Changes in the Ellsworth area highway network, possible bypass schemes, rerouting Rtes 1, 1A, and 3 around Ellsworth could significantly alter traffic patterns in Lamoine and impact land use patterns.  While an Ellsworth bypass system is probably a decade away, almost any route it might take would effect Lamoine as the Jordan River and the Union River Bay set physical limits to any bypass route.


 

2.         EMPLOYMENT PATTERNS AND TRANSPORTATION

 

            In both the 1980 census and in the 1991 survey, 84% of Lamoine residents worked within the county.  The 1991 survey offered additional details.

 

Place of Work

Number

Lamoine

52

Ellsworth

97

MDI

63

Bangor

13

Trenton

6

Hancock

3

Orono

3

Blue Hill

2

Other

14

11% have jobs that take them all over the state

 

The data (1980) indicates that 76% of those who drive, drive alone, 13% drive with other family members or in a carpool and 11% work at home or within walking distance of their home.  The average drive to work takes only fifteen minutes but 3% must drive for more than forty-five minutes to reach their jobs.

 

3.         COMMUNITY VIEWS         

 

            While local roads are often in poor condition in the springtime, there is a great deal of local understanding of the situation as seen in the survey responses (1991).

 

Road Maintenance

Spend More on Roads

Satisfied

64%

Yes

23%

Not Satisfied

23%

No

46%

No Opinion

9%

No Opinion

24%

 

            The survey indicated many residents saw some upkeep problems and specifically cited ditching, shoulder drop-offs, and edge markings.  There were some comments about excessive speed on the Buttermilk Road.

 



D.  AIR TRANSPORTATION

 

            The Hancock County Airport is conveniently located in Trenton providing local service to Bangor and Boston but the future of this airport is uncertain in this era of deregulation.  Its principal usage is probably in providing summer service for corporate and private planes in the Acadia National Park – Bar Harbor region.  Most outgoing air passenger traffic from Lamoine uses Bangor International which is about an hour away by road.

 

PART V. PUBLIC FACILITIES AND SERVICES

 

A. WATER SUPPLY

 

            The majority of Lamoine residents get their water from private wells.  Slightly over 50 households are served by the Cold Spring Water Co.  Maintenance of water quality, potentially threatened by the presence of a Town Dump, the numerous gravel pits, sand/salt piles, and the porous nature of some local soils, is of concern to the residents.  An inventory and analysis of all the local wells is in the Gerber Report (SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER STUDY, 55 pages, 1983).

 

B.  ENERGY FACILITIES

 

            Local electricity is provided by Bangor Hydroelectric Company whose headquarters are in Bangor and whose nearest branch Office is in Ellsworth.

            There are no local generating facilities or substations in the community.  Bangor HydroElectric maintains a Hancock County local center for regional repair and maintenance.  It is in Lamoine on Route 204.

 

C.  SEWAGE FACILITIES

 

            All town residents have private home septic systems for sewage disposal.  All septic systems must be on-site.

 

D.  SOLID WASTE

 

            Solid waste is disposed of at the Town Dump, located in a gravel pit off Route 184.  The DEP requires that this dump be closed by the end of 1992.  It now appears that 1993 will represent the actual closing requirement.  The cost of closing and monitoring is expected to be a major item in the town budget in the near future.  Estimated costs range from $60,000 – 100,000 per acre.  At this time only PERC is available as an alternative.  The town has received a $50,000 grant from the state in the Jobs Bond program, a 2:1 matching award, for the construction of a transfer station at the site of the municipal gravel pit.  This was started this October for completion in the spring of 1993.  As soon as this is completed and available, the town will close the local landfill operation and shift to PERC for disposal of wastes.

            At the April, 1990 Town Meeting, the residents voted to join with six nearby towns to set up a recycling center.  The seven-town organization, Coastal Recycling, has received a $90,000 grant from the state.  It has incorporated and built a recycling center with pickup stations at the local dumps, including Lamoine.  The center has reduced Lamoine’s solid waste by 18% and should reduce the level by 50% by 1994 as mandated by the state.  Currently, plastics (number 1 and 2), aluminum and tin cans, newspaper, office paper, brown bags, corrugated cardboard, and colored and clear glass are being recycled.

 

E.  PUBLIC SAFETY

 

            Police services are provided by the Hancock County Sheriff’s office.  State Police protection is also available.

            The Lamoine Volunteer Fire Department is an effective organization with about 25 active members.  Additional coverage is provided by an automatic mutual aid pact with the Ellsworth Fire Department and other area volunteer services.

            There is a new tank truck, purchased in 1989, that should provide service for many years.  A capital improvement plan is in place, with an appropriation provided each year at the Town Meeting, to pay for large items like the new truck.  An additional truck will be required within the next five years.  This unit will cost about $105,000 but the firemen expect to raise 25% of this cost, the town has put away another 25%, and the impact on the town will not be excessive.  The fire station is new as of 1991 and will meet the town’s needs for the coming decade.  The town has a contract, renewed annually, with County Ambulance of Ellsworth for ambulance services.  In 1989, the contract cost was $953.

 

F.  COMMUNICATIONS

 

            Local telephone service is provided by New England Telephone Company with local offices in Bangor.

            Local news is covered by the Hancock County Edition of the Bangor Daily News (daily delivery) and the weekly Ellsworth American (mail delivery).

            There are several radio stations in Ellsworth while the nearest television stations are in Bangor.  Parts of Lamoine along the main roads are served by United Video Cablevision, Inc. from Rockland, ME.

            Lamoine has no post office and mail comes through the Ellsworth office.

 

G.  HEALTH CARE

 

            The town is served by several regional hospitals, the closest of which is Maine Coast Memorial Hospital in Ellsworth.  The closest major medical facility is Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor.  Emergency services are also provided by Med Now in Ellsworth, close to the Lamoine line.  There are no health or dental care services available in Lamoine.

 

 

H.  CULTURE

 

            Lamoine lies in the midst of an area with a vital and vigorous artistic summer colony which surprises strangers with its numerous chamber music concerts, operas, plays, literary presentations, and exhibits.  A legacy of its past as a summer retreat for the hoi polloi of the eastern metropolitan areas, when Bar Harbor was a name to conjure with, artists and authors, sculptors and composers have sought this area, found it pleasant, and returned long after the heyday of their illustrious patrons had past.  The summer offerings are outstanding and the retired components of this group provide and sponsor a winter repertoire that is unusual for such a rural area.  Full concert type programs are also offered regularly at the Center for the Performing Arts, Orono, site of the University of Maine, and at Bangor Civic Center, Bangor, both of these being within an hour’s drive of Lamoine.

            A summer lecture program is usually presented at the College of the Atlantic at Bar Harbor.  There are many artisans in the Bar Harbor Area: weavers, potters, silversmiths, ironworkers, and many Indian crafts workers.  Numerous galleries and fine shops are also found in nearby Blue Hill.  Bar Harbor is a port of call for thirty or so cruise ships per summer and has the type of shops one would expect catering to this up-scale trade.  It also has available tourist services such as whale-watching cruises and flights, deep sea fishing trips, and schooner sailing trips.

            Lamoine residents have borrowing privileges at the Ellsworth City Library.  Students also have had access to the Lamoine school library during school hours and one day a week in the summer through a volunteer program.  In addition, books are also available through the State Library’s “Books by Mail” program. 

            The Lamoine Historical Society meets monthly and maintains a small museum in the basement of the East Lamoine Meeting House.

 

I.  RECREATION

 

            For those whose interests are athletic, a varied fare is available.  The University of Maine offers Division One hockey, basketball, football, baseball, etc.  Sports programs are also available at Maine Maritime Academy at Castine and Husson College at Bangor.  There are numerous local foot races, cross-country ski races, and yachting events.  Acadia National Park is only 12 miles away, with its miles of bike trails, nature walks, cross-country trails, carriage roads, and mountain climbing and hiking trails.  There are two golf courses within ten minutes drive.

            Lamoine has two town parks, Bloomfield Park at Blunt’s Pond and Lamoine Beach Town Park on the ocean at the end of Route 184.  Bloomfield Park is a favorite summer swimming spot for local residents and is occasionally used to launch canoes.  The Frenchman Bay Riders, a snowmobile club, maintains a clubhouse on Blunt’s Pond just beyond the park.  Since the entrance to Bloomfield Park is an unmarked dirt road, nonresident summer visitors use it rarely and many local residents are unaware of its existence.

            Lamoine Beach Town Park is on Frenchman Bay and has a boat launching ramp, picnic area with tables and grills, a water pump, and toilet facilities.  The beach is a popular swimming, wading, and sunbathing area.  It has an excellent view of the bay, has a biologically rich intertidal zone, and is often used for school trips by area schools.  A list of organisms found on the beach will be found in the Appendix.  It is also a popular site for SCUBA club meetings and training classes.  The problems that might arise from increased use of these parks should be examined.  Both parks have private homes nearby and ways to provide mutual protection should be explored.  The Town Beach could be readily extended another 500 feet.

            The town also owns a small part of Marlboro Beach.  It is undeveloped and public access is unmarked as is the limit of public ownership.  Residents often use Marlboro Beach as a site for boat launching and the beach is a recognized stopover site for migratory seabirds.  The future of this area needs consideration by the community.

            A recreation plan should be developed to decide whether any of these recreation areas should be expanded or simply maintained for the next five years.  The town should also consider whether it wishes a permanent site for its summer youth program baseball games.  The field is not town-owned but is made available through a local citizen’s generosity.

            There is a playground at the school which is used after school and on weekends.  There is a Little League program which is very popular and well run. 

            The State maintains Lamoine State Park, which has a beach, boat launching area, pier, camping and picnic areas, and a playground.  Entrance fees are charged.  The park is also the site of a Department of Marine Resources laboratory which monitors red tide and other pollution and water quality problems in the shellfishery from the Penobscot River to the Canadian line.  While this park is heavily used at present, burdens might be placed on the town were the park to be expanded.

 

J.  CEMETERIES

 

            There are a total of thirteen cemeteries in Lamoine.  East Lamoine Cemetery, Forest Hill Cemetery, and the Marlboro Cemetery are overseen by cemetery associations and plots are available for purchase.  The remaining ten cemeteries are inactive family cemeteries.  Information on these can be obtained from the Historical Society.

 

PART VI  NATURAL RESOURCES

 

A.  GENERAL INFORMATION

 

            Lamoine has an extensive wildlife population and deer, fox, rabbit, raccoon, skunk, and partridge are abundant and there is moderate hunting pressure.  Lamoine is one of the richest and least polluted marine resource areas of the state.  Marine worms are available in commercial quantities, the Jordan River and Raccoon Cove areas supporting about a dozen commercial diggers during the summer months.  These areas are, probably, completely raked up to three times per year and some wormers feel the resource is declining but, of course, this falls under the aegis of State regulation.  There was once a plentiful soft clam harvest but there are only small supplies of these left.  Restoration could be attempted and might be feasible if the town were willing to expend funds but success would require some local protection laws, enforcement and the cooperation of the State.  Edible mussels are locally plentiful and some are harvested commercially for mussel aquaculture farms, one off Old Point, another in the mouth of the Jordan River.  This wild resource is still viable and local residents often harvest some for their own consumption.  Lobsters and crabs are harvested off Lamoine and divers collect scallops off the State Park, in the Jordan and Skillings rivers, and in Mt. Desert Narrows.  Some sea urchins are harvested for shipment to Japan and there is occasional harvesting of periwinkles.  Various sea ducks are hunted in the fall.  Bluefish and mackerel are caught in Eastern Bay and in Frenchman Bay itself.  Pogies are harvested for conversion to fish meal and this activity varies year to year as the pogie population moves about and their numbers wax and wane.  While this last activity may occur in the local waters, it is done by boats that are not local or locally based.

            There is a Marine Patrol office in Lamoine as well as a Marine Resources Water Testing Lab.  The Marine Patrol is active from Searsport to the Canadian border and is one of the three state law enforcement agencies.  In addition to their policing function, the Patrol assists the Coast Guard in search and rescue operations and other agencies such as the Department of Human Services as is necessary.

 

B.  DEER AND BEAR POPULATION

 

            Lamoine is located in Deer Management District 16 as designated by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.  This district basically includes the southern part of Hancock County.  The Department estimates (1990-91) that there are approximately 7-9 deer per square mile in the district or 198-254 deer in Lamoine.  In 1990, 517 deer were reported taken in District 16.

            No exact figures on the local bear population are available, but, in 1991, ninety bear were taken during the season in Hancock County.  Using information on population densities, a worker with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife estimated a bear population of about six for Lamoine.  An occasional moose is seen in Lamoine.  There are the usual population of non-game animals typical of coastal Maine:  deer mice, bog lemmings, short tailed weasels, etc.

            An inventory of local invertebrates and birds may be found in Appendix 3.  The University has had a long-standing relationship to the community.  The current State Park site was for many years the University’s coastal station and many Zoology and Botany Department research projects, masters’ theses, doctoral dissertations, and class field trips had Lamoine as their site.  There are some projects on marine subtidal plants that are still proceeding and that have locales off Lamoine.

 

C.  WILDLIFE HABITAT

 

            On a statewide level, Maine has protected endangered and threatened wildlife and the habitats that support them by enacting the Maine Endangered Species Act (MESA 12 M.R.S.A. §7751-7758) and the Natural Resources Protection Act (NRPA, 38 M.R.S.A. § 480-A-5).  Areas identified as important under MESA are designated “Essential” Wildlife Habitats; those falling under NRPA are called “Significant” Wildlife Habitats.  Both “Essential”  and “Significant” habitats fall under state protection.

 

            In Lamoine, there are no areas designated as Essential Wildlife Habitats but there are several areas identified as Significant Wildlife Habitats.  These comprise a deer wintering area off Walker Rd. and shorebird nesting, feeding, and staging areas on the tidal flats of the Jordan River, Raccoon Cove, Partridge Cove and the Skillings River. 

            In addition, the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife has mapped several areas designated as “Coastal Wildlife Concentration Areas”:

            CLASS A ---   Skillings River

                                    Berry Cove

                                    Jordan River

            CLASS B ---   Raccoon Cove

                                    Mount Desert Narrows

            CLASS C ---   Lamoine Beach

 

            The state has also identified several “Areas of Special Concern For Wildlife”.  Like Coastal Wildlife Concentration Areas, these have no direct state protection, but are, nonetheless, deemed important.  Lamoine has the following “Areas of Special Concern”:

 

            Bald eagle nest sites --  Eagle Point (two sites)

            (known to have been used        Seal Point (two sites)

            in the past)

 

            Bald eagle wintering sites --      Raccoon Cove

                                                            Jordan River

 

            Seal haul-outs   --                     Great Ledge

 

D.  LOCAL MARINE WATER QUALITY

 

            Maine waters are subjected to many demands which may pollute the waters to such an extent that they cannot be used for certain activities.  To balance the use of water, the state legislature has enacted a water classification system.

            In marine waters, there are three classes:  SA, SB, and SC.  Each class designates slightly different usages and sets characteristics to be maintained.  Through the management of waste discharge licenses, development permits, and Shoreland zoning, the state manages its public water for the uses designated by the legislature.

            The water classification for Lamoine is SB.  SB waters are Maine’s general-purpose waters in which multiple activities are balanced to minimize conflicts and maximize general public benefits.  For example, discharge of waste is permitted but only if they meet specific standards to protect traditional and/or multiple uses such as swimming, fishing, and preserve the marine organisms indigenous to the area.

            All waters, regardless of class, are to have sufficient quality to support some level of recreation in and on the water.  No waste discharge can have such an impact such that the safety of human health and/or ecological stability is threatened or that would cause the waterway to be considered a public nuisance.

 

 

 


           

 

 

 

 

 

 

E.  LOCAL WATER TESTING

 

            The Department of Marine Resources maintains a laboratory at the Lamoine State Park which is responsible for regional water quality testing.  It is required to test marine waters overlying shellfish growing areas and to conduct shoreline surveys to identify pollution sources.  The DMR has eight water quality sampling stations located around the coast of Lamoine as indicated by the map.  These areas are tested approximately every five weeks throughout the year.

            The most recent closures of shellfish areas were in March and December, 1989.  The affected areas were the Jordan River and the Mud Creek areas.  Since that time, there have been no closures and water quality has been excellent.  The DMR surveys have not identified any pollution sources.  The most common cause for closure of local waters is the occurrence periodically of “Red Tide” a condition caused when there is an excessive population of a marine flagellate that shellfish may take up.  The shellfish will then contain toxins that can be lethal to humans.  Lamoine’s shellfish, periodically, have had such infestations.

 

PART VII  BUSINESS, COMMERCE AND LABOR

 

A.  GENERAL SURVEY

 

            Lamoine is a bedroom town with a conspicuous retirement component.  It does not produce jobs for its residents.  The major commercial activity is gravel mining.  There are several local contractors whose operations are, in part, supported by such gravel availability, but, in general, the gravel removal is done by outside corporations and hiring is not local.  The pits operated by local residents are small and represent only a fraction of the business.

            There are 13 active gravel pits currently in operation, run by some 9 operators.  The “Gravel Extraction Ordinance” was revised in 1989.  There is some litigation now in progress but this will not impose any future costs on the town, being essentially an enforcement effort.

            There is a small shellfish packing industry in town.  There are two companies, Brigg’s Shellfish and Boynton Shellfish, which, at peak, employ 36 people.  Some crabmeat picking is also done as a cottage industry by several individuals.  In addition there is a substantial lobster pound operated by Mr. Alvarez.  There is also a Bangor Hydro service building.

            There are several contractors in the community.  Some of these do general construction and one maintains an office building and some garage facilities.

            Some wood harvesting is done in the community and there are four skidders listed in the town records.  There are about six individual operations but it is difficult to quantify since most cutting by the local group is done outside of Lamoine.  In addition, there is some harvesting associated with gravel pit extension work.

            The Lamoine job market is, essentially, the Ellsworth job market, with Bar Harbor and Mount Desert Island as secondary sources of employment.  The last two areas have a severe housing shortage and those who work there generally worked there before settling in Lamoine.  This component of local employment may be deceptive and related to housing patterns which may change independently of employment availability.  Ellsworth supplies jobs in the retail and trade areas and these are dependent on the commercial vitality of that area.  Ellsworth, being regional center for services, also provides a wide range of professional opportunities in the medical, legal, and social work fields.  Overall Lamoine’s employment will depend on Ellsworth’s commercial success and continued dominance Downeast.

            It must be realized that Ellsworth is several things besides the regional shopping center.  It is the tourist gateway to Acadia National Park and is an attractive lake resort in its own right. As a regional shopping center, Ellsworth has few competitors.  Machias is too peripheral to the population, Bar Harbor too pricey and difficult to reach during the tourist season, and only Bucksport could, reasonably, be expected to be a rival.  Bucksport has a strong industrial tax base and is the only local area with such a base.  It also lies on the tourist route to Acadia National Park.  A large shopping mall in the Bucksport-Orland area would have a significant impact on Ellsworth sales.  Such developments require advance planning and infrastructure development that is not in existence now in that area while Ellsworth is on the verge of a major commercial expansion which may be autocatalytic and leave Bucksport at a serious competitive disadvantage.  This is all to the advantage of Lamoine, but, nevertheless, a close eye must be kept on Ellsworth’s economic health.

 

B.  DAY CARE AVAILABILITY

 

            There is a private, non-profit, accredited nursery school that is run by a parent cooperative.  It is housed in the Lamoine Baptist Church and currently enrolls 21 students and has the capacity to enroll 24.  At the school there is an after-school program which provides care for children of school age from kindergarten up to grade eight.  Ellsworth provides additional facilities and these are important since many people from Lamoine work in Ellsworth convenient to these day-care opportunities.  There are several State-licensed Day Care Homes and two State-licensed Day Care Centers (for children above age three) in Ellsworth.

 

PART VIII  GENERAL ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICES

 

A.  INTRODUCTION

 

            Lamoine has a selectman type government, a part-time administrative assistant, a town clerk, and a treasurer.  Town offices are housed in the old N. Lamoine school which has just been completely remodeled and facilities are adequate for the next decade.   The Town has just built a new Fire Station at the Village on the site of the old station.

            A major expense facing the town is the construction of a sand, salt, and gravel storage building as required by the State.  Current estimates are that the cost will be about $75,000, of which 55% will be paid by the state.  The town is in the process of constructing a transfer station.   Most of the funds involved were from the state as part of the job bond.

 

 

B.  FISCAL SUMMARY

 

Year

1988

1989

1990

1991

Town Total Receipts

1,157,263

1,123,690

1,678,042

1,989,782

Total Aid from State

335,686

403,406

467,616

543,944

Education State Aid

276,903

323,811

390,077

455,124

Other State Aid

58,679

79,595

77,539

88,820

Total Expended

1,095,597

1,091,216

1,596,436

1,966,782

Total School Exp

679,012

716,702

892,550

1,009,288

 

 

TOTAL VALUATIONS (BY TOWN)

 

Year

1988

1989

1990

1991

Real Estate

37,950,600

39,909,500

41,813,600

43,178,900

Personal

633,200

646,900

762,800

862,400

Total

38,583,800

40,566,400

42,576,400

44,041,300

State Evaluation

41,300,000

48,100,000

55,300,000

76,250,000

 

(1992-74,550,000)

(1993 prelim. 75,050,000)

 

C.  TOWN SCHOOL-FISCAL INTERFACE

 

Year

1988

1989

1990

1991

Total Students

209

232

207

228

Exp. Per Pupil

$3335

$3089

$4312

$4426

State Aid/Pupil

$1329

$1396

$1884

$1996

Town Share/Pupil

$2006

$1693

$2428

$2430

%State Ed Share

40

45

44

45

 

D.  EXISTING ORDINANCES

 

            The town ordinances seem to fall into two groups.  The Building Code and the Shoreline Zoning Regulations are in one group, accepted, with many finding them too permissive, and a goodly number finding them too restrictive, and, on the other hand, the Gravel Pit Ordinance, which is viewed as too permissive.  It is doubtful that this really represents discontent with the ordinance, but, rather, represents discontent with the gravel trucks on the roads.  In the opinion poll, these trucks drew a substantial number of write in comments, usually, quite vigorous and negative.  It may be that the adverse reaction to the ordinance reflects a mood rather than a specific objection.

 

 

from 1991 survey

PART IX   EDUCATION

 

            Lamoine is a member of Union 92 which consists of Lamoine, Surry, Trenton, Hancock, Mariaville, Otis, and SAD 26 (Eastbrook and Waltham).  An elementary school is maintained in each of these locales, SAD 26 being a single combined unit.  The Union tuitions students to outside high schools of their choice.

 

1992 – December – Total Enrollment – 241

            During the last ten years, the school population has been extremely stable.  While the town’s population increased by 358 people, the school population rose by only 6.  The School Board must give the Selectmen the longest lead-time possible in fiscal planning if the school fiscal requirements increase.  There must be broad community involvement.  There will probably be a slow creep upward in average class size over the next decade (see Appendix 4) and, certainly, there will be funding formula changes.

            A reassessment of property in the town of Lamoine is now in progress and will, presumably, have a substantial impact on the town’s finances.  The state school subsidy for Lamoine is usually about 50%.

 

POLICIES AND POLICY IMPLEMENTATION RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COMMITTEE

 

1.     ORDERLY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

 

            The town shall adopt and periodically update an official land use map which designates areas suitable for growth and development, areas where the rural and agricultural characteristics of the community shall be preserved and enhanced, residential areas which shall be protected from strip development, areas which shall provide the community with marine access, and areas which shall provide protection for the town’s natural resources.

 

            The committee recommends the following Land Use Plan (as shown in the accompanying map):

 

A.  Lot Sizes

            All lots shall have a minimum size of 60,000 square feet unless they are on sand and gravel soils when the lot minimum size shall be reduced to 40,000 square feet.  If the lot is connected to a public water and sewer system the minimum lot size shall be 22,000 square feet regardless of soil type.  Such ordinances as shall be directed to this purpose shall provide a grace period of one year before becoming effective to provide for local adjustment to the new standards.  For legal lots preexisting such date, the area requirements shall remain as they were.

 

B.      Continuation of Shoreland Zoning in accordance with and at the level recommended by the State.  There is a Coastal Fisheries and Marine Activities Zone which encompasses the Town Beach and the entry area at Marlboro Beach.  This should guarantee access to the coast for marine usage and should provide protection for our coastal, pond, and stream areas.  The lobster pound area at Seal Point is in and should remain in the existing Limited Commercial Zone.

 

C.      Continuation of the Hazardous Flood Plain Zone, in accordance with federal law.

 

D.      Retain Resource Protection Zones to include the first 100 ft. in the Shoreland Zone and such areas that may fall within the Hazardous Flood Plain Zone.  This should simplify the protection of these areas. 

 

E.      Establish a Residential Zone which would permit any type residence, single, mobile home, duplex, or multiple housing.  Commercial usage would be excluded except home occupancy types involving no more than two employees in addition to household residents.  This zone would include both sides of the Buttermilk road, on the east to a line 800 feet from Route 184 and paralleling it, and on the west to the Trenton line, and extending from the Ellsworth line to its intersection with the Development Zone at Route 204.  This is to protect this area from strip development and preserve a low cost housing area convenient to the job market in Ellsworth.  Subdivisions within this zone, provided with public water and sewage connections and connected to such and providing their own entrance road, may reduce the frontage requirement on such roads within the development to 100 ft. per unit.  Provisions shall be developed for multiple unit housing with public water and sewage connections requiring such units to provide adequate open areas and screening exclusive of their parking requirements.  All new subdivisions having 15 or more units shall provide single entrances and screening of at least 50 feet depth along the road from which they have their entrance.  Non-traditional arrangements of housing, so-called cluster developments, with public water and sewage systems, may be considered by the planning board, providing these meet the other overall criteria for land use.  The Planning board may require long-term protection within such developments for critical wetlands, wildlife, and recreational areas.  Cluster developments in this zone must meet the overall frontage and acreage requirements applicable in this zone but individual lots within the development may be below the minimum providing net residential density is no granter than is permitted in the Residential Zone and all other requirements for cluster development projects as specified in the land use ordinance are met.

 

F.      Establish a Development Zone, land use rules remaining, as they now exist.  This zone would be T shaped consisting of the Jordan River Road (Route 204) from the Trenton line to Route 184 and along Route 184 from the south end of the Richard King lot to the north end of the abandoned gravel pit beyond the Town Hall.  On the shore side of the T, the zone would extend to the Shoreland zone along the ocean.  On all other sides of the T, the zone would extend 800 feet back from he road.  This area has substantial commercial usage now, is the area of highest traffic flow in the community and is centrally located.

 

G.      The remainder of the town shall be classified Rural and Agricultural with rules similar to the current land use rules but more restrictive to commercial uses and encouraging to agricultural usage, permitting residential usage, including (but not limited to) bed and breakfasts, housing for the elderly, and nursing homes.  This area would prohibit heavy industrial usages, quarrying and mining of all types but sand and gravel removal would still be permitted.  Also prohibited would be new private dumps, automobile graveyards, and any usages that might lead to toxic waste contamination of the aquifer.

 

            To preserve the rural and agricultural nature of this area, all new subdivisions:

            1.         a. shall have single entrances from the main road, and

b. shall provide 50 foot depth of screening along such main road and wherever such development abuts exiting main roads, and

                        c. may submit a cluster design for consideration.

 

            2. having 16 or more units:

a.       shall have single entrances from the main road, and

b.      shall provide 50 foot depth of screening along such main road and wherever such development abuts existing main roads,

c.       shall present a cluster design, and,

d.      provide 80,000 sq. ft. of permanent commons for each 16 units or additional fraction thereof planned.  Commons shall be held by the developer, a development association, or conveyed to the town and, however held, taxed appropriately proportionate to the degree of public access or public purpose served. 

 

Cluster developments in this zone must meet the overall frontage and acreage requirements applicable in this zone but individual lots within the development may be below the minimums providing net residential density is no greater than is permitted in the Rural and Agricultural Zone and all other requirements for cluster development projects as specified in the land use ordinance are met.  Commons include but are not limited to areas for recreational use (playing fields, snowmobile, hiking, or skiing trails, playgrounds, etc.), ornamentation (garden, park areas, etc.), protection of natural resources (deer yards, wetlands, eagle nest sites, timber stands, etc.), or scenic views, or common access to the coast, or common protection such as a fire pond.  The purpose of the commons is to enhance the long-term value of the development and provide significant open space to preserve the rural nature of the town.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  PLANNING BOARD

SCHEDULE: TO BE PRESENTED TO THE TOWN WITHIN TWO YEARS OF COMP. PLAN ACCEPTANCE BY THE COMMUNITY

COST: PRINTING MATERIALS, ETC. $2,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  POPULATION GROWTH

 

            The town shall monitor population growth to provide adequate planning information.

            The committee recommends that the Code Enforcement Officer ask the owners of newly completed housing units for the projected number of occupants and that the Town Clerk then maintain an updated population estimate based on said information.

INPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  CEO AND TOWN CLERK

SCHEDULE:  ONGOING

COST:  NONE

 

3.  PUBLIC FACILITIES*

 

            The town shall provide and maintain adequate public facilities.

 

            The committee finds that present facilities are adequate and should suffice until 2000 but should be monitored to anticipate changes in municipal requirements.

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN

*EDUCATION FACILITIES TREATED ELSEWHERE

SCHEDULE: ONGOING

COST: NONE

 

4.  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

 

            The Town recognizes that is economic state is dependent on the economy of the area, especially on Ellsworth’s commercial development and the maintenance of the Mount Desert Island tourist trade and its advanced scientific and educational facilities.  While Lamoine has clearly chosen to be a residential area, regional changes may have a strong impact on the community.  While an Ellsworth bypass is not in the immediate future, the siting of such a bypass could have serious consequences for the future of Lamoine.  The Lamoine Selectmen must be involved with the planning of such a bypass from its earliest inception.

            The committee recommends that the Selectmen support any political or economic initiatives that enhance these regional activities.  They should approach the Trenton, Ellsworth, Hancock, Surry, and the MDI towns, and establish a regional coordination group on Area Development.

IMPLEMENTATION RESOPNSIBILITY: SELECTMEN AND TOWN ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

SCHEDULE: ON ACCEPTANCE OF THIS PLAN

COST: NONE IN CURRENT BUDGET YEAR, PROBABLY MINOR FOR IMMEDIATE FUTURE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.   SAFE AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING

 

            The town will promote and encourage affordable housing for its residents.

 

a.                   The committee recommends that the Selectmen appoint a Housing Committee to keep track of the local housing situation for the elderly and the availability of low-income housing grants.  The committee should, as necessary, make recommendations to the Selectmen, and, upon the Selectmen’s approval, draft proposals and seek grants in these areas for presentation to the town.

 

b.                  As a safety measure, all mobile homes sited, hereafter, in the community must meet or exceed the design criteria of the National Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards Act of 1974, United States Code, Title 42, Chapter 70 and be so certified or shall be brought to substantially equivalent standards subject to inspection and approval by the Code Enforcement Officer.

 

c.                   The current Mobile Home Park Ordinance of the town shall be reviewed and revised, as necessary, to be in accordance with Title 30 MRSA § 4358.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  THE SELECTMEN SHALL SET UP THE HOUSING COMMITTEE, THE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SHALL DRAFT THE SAFETY ORDINANCE, AND THE PARK ORDINANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE SHALL BE SET UP BY THE SELECTMEN TO INCLUDE A PLANNING BOARD MEMBER AS CHAIR.

SCHEDULE:  ALL ACTIONS TO BE DONE ON ACCEPTANCE OF THE PLAN BY THE COMMUNITY.  THE HOUSING COMMITTEE CHALL MAKE AN ANNUAL REPORT TO THE SELECTMEN, THE PARK ORDINANCE REVISION AND THE SAFETY ORDINANCE SHALL BE PRESENTED TO THE TOWN WITHIN TWO YEARS AT A REGULARLY SCHEDULED TOWN MEETING.

COST:  $200

 

6.  WATER RESOURCES

 

            The town shall take such action as is necessary to protect the local water supply.

 

            The committee recommends:

 

a.       On all sand and gravel deposits and up to 100 feet from their edge, all storage of toxic materials, oil, gasoline, toxic chemicals, etc., shall be in an adequate container stored within a leak proof base sufficient to retain the whole volume should leakage occur.

 

b.      As soon as possible, the town shall protect its salt pile from the weather.  The town shall seek funding to build a salt shed jointly with Trenton in accordance with the planning proposal passed at the 1994 Town Meeting.

 

c.       The town will record such lots as have repeatedly failed to pass septic standard tests and periodically determine if such areas constitute a wetland that should be placed in the Resource Protection Zone and the assessment adjusted.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  a. PLANNING BOARD, b. SELECTMEN, c. PLANNING BOARD AND CEO

 

SCHEDULE: a. INCLUDE IN NEXT CODE REVIEW, b. UPON STATE FUNDING APPROVAL, c. PERIODICALLY AS PART OF ONGOING OVERSIGHT OF THE Board.

 

COST: a AND c HAVE NO SIGNIFICANT COST BUT b. IS DEPENDENT ON SOLUTION ADOPTED AND SOME OF THESE SOLUTIONS MAY DEPEND ON THE AVAILABILITY OF STATE FUNDS, CURRENTLY NOT AVAILABLE.

 

7  CRITICAL NATURAL RESOURCES

 

            The town shall protect and preserve its critical natural areas.

 

            The committee recommends placing such resources within protected zones, such as the land use section mandates, and maintaining existing park areas, expanding them when necessary as population grows and as usage increases.  Any cluster type development or traditional land use development greater than 15 acres must indicate critical natural areas encompassed and submit a plan for adequate protection of such sites in their plan submission.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN

SCHEDULE: ONGOING

COST:  ONLY IF EVENTUAL ACTION NECESSARY

 

8.  MARINE RESOURCES

 

The town will provide marine access and take such action as is permissible to protect its marine resources.

 

The committee recommends:

 

a.                   That marine access be maintained through the Lamoine Beach and Marlboro access sites, through cooperation with the state in preserving access at Lamoine State Park, and pursuit of any additional sites that may become available.  The town officers should seek state and federal funding to assist in ramp maintenance and construction.

b.                  A Marine Resources Committee should be appointed and it should broach the possibility of separating claming and worming areas with the DMR, the steps necessary to restore claming, and the feasibility of protecting mussels.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN TO APPOINT THE COMMITTEE

SCHEDULE:  WHEN THE PLAN IS ACCEPTED

COST: NONE UNTIL AFTER STUDY PROVIDES AN ESTIMATE

 

9.  AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST RESOURCES

 

The town shall encourage landowners to develop and expand sustainable usage of suitable land for agriculture and forestry harvest.

The committee recommends that land usage be regulated in such a way as to provide the minimal necessary regulation for good sustainable agricultural and forestry practice.  To this end, the town shall seek the advice of the Maine Forest Service to obtain a Best Management Practices recommendation for town adoption and ask assistance from the Maine Forest Service in analysis of the town’s forested area.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN WITH ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT PROVIDING THE PRELIMINARY WORK

SCHEDULE: AS SOON AS POSSIBLE, FOR PRESENTAION TO THE PLANNING BOARD WITHIN A YEAR.

COST:  $500

 

10. HISTORIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES

 

The town shall identify and mark its historic sites and protect archaeologically important areas.

a.                             The Lamoine Historical Society should be asked to list local houses and sites of historic meaning, describe their significance, and eventually develop an official town history.   Upon receipt of this information, the town shall decide which sites should be identified by plaques or other types of historic tagging.  Should any sites have more than local interest, the Maine Historic Preservation Commission should be approached for advice as to appropriate action.

b.                             The town of Lamoine has 24 miles of its coastline listed as archaeologically sensitive by state agencies who may prevent development on tracts that prove to have ancient sites within them.  This fact should be printed on all building permits and a warning given that discovery of significant artifacts requires work cessation and that such discovery must be reported to the Selectmen for appraisal and action which may include a temporary cessation of construction.  Most of this area falls within the designated Resource Protection Zone.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN

SCHEDULE:  REQUEST TO SOCIETY SHOULD BE INITIATED AT ONCE

COST:  NONE TILL AFTER THE INFORMATION IS GENERATED AND THEREAFTER LESS THAN $2000

 

 

11.  OUTDOOR RECREATION

 

            The town shall maintain Lamoine Beach Park and Bloomfield Park for outdoor recreation and shall, as funds permit, seek to acquire a town owned site for summer recreational activities.  A Recreation Committee shall be set up to monitor use of the local facilities and provide guidance on the town’s needs, initiate programs with the consent of the selectmen, and recommend expenditures to the Selectmen.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN AND SUBSEQUENT TO APPOINTMENT, THE COMMITTEE DESIGNATED.

SCHEDULE:  ONGOING PROCESS AFTER COMMITTEE APPOINTED WITHIN 6 MONTHS OF PLAN APPROVAL

COST:  IMMEDIATELY, AROUND $200 TO PUT SIGNS ON BLOOMFIELD PARK, THEREAFTER VARIABLE. AS RECOMMENDATIONS ARE PROFFERED.

 

12  COASTAL POLICIES

 

            The town shall take such action as may be required to prevent contamination of the coastal zone, inappropriate placement of anchorages, monopoly usage precluding public usages, and shoreline destruction.

            Most of these problems fall principally within the jurisdiction of the state and federal government but the town selectmen should be authorized to maintain a watching brief in these areas.  The town Administrative Assistant shall explore whether there is a significant need for further action on anchorages and review shore pollution problems with residents and visitors.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESONSIBILITY:  ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT / HARBOR MASTER

SCHEDULE:  CONTINUOUS OVERSIGHT

COST:  NONE IMMEDIATELY

 

 

 

13.  CAPITAL INVESTMENT

 

            The town shall maintain a prudent fiscal stance at all times.

 

            The committee recommends:

 

a.       The town shall maintain a Budget Committee to consult with the Selectmen and recommend to the Selectmen prudent funding for the projects proposed by the Selectmen and the Town Departments, and make their recommendations to the Town Meeting.  The committee, in its first year and, periodically, every five years thereafter, shall present to the Selectmen a Long Range Fiscal Plan for their guidance.  The town shall establish a debt limit for future bonding.  The committee suggests that 1% of State Valuation would be a prudent ceiling excluding school funding and this ceiling would be raised to 4% total should school funding be included.

 

b.      The town shall maintain the Transfer Station

 

c.       A decision should be made as to the long term handling of Seal Point Road, Blacksmith Road, Gully Brook Road, and Berry Cove Road.  If these are ever to be paved, the town should begin putting aside funds for that purpose.

 

d.      The selectmen shall establish a committee to define the conditions, procedures, and charges required for fair implementation of the impact fee for purposes consistent with this plan’s capital investment objectives or delete impact fees from the existing ordinance.  This must be done immediately before the occasion for its use is upon us. 

 

e.       A new school addition is looming and the Selectmen and the School Board should consult at once about financing the project and reach mutual agreement on funding level.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  a.  BUDGET COMMITTEE, b. SELECTMEN, c. SELECTMEN, d. COMMITTEE ON IMPACT FEES

SCHEDULE:  a. AT ONCE, b. ONGOING (CURRENTLY IN COMPLIANCE), c. PREPARE WARRANT ARTICLE FOR NEXT TOWN MEETING WHEN TOWN CAN MAKE THIS DECISION, d. WITHIN SIX MONTHS OF PLAN ACCEPTANCE FOR NEXT SUBSEQUENT TOWN MEETING.  

COST:  a. NONE, b. PROBABLY $40,000 PER YEAR FOR 5 YEARS BUT HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON STATE LEVEL OF CONTRIBUTION, c. WOULD REQUIRE ENGINEERING ESTIMATE, d. NONE

 

 

 

14  SOCIAL WELFARE

 

            The town shall maintain adequate monitoring of those people most at risk within the community to see that there is a meaningful safety net.

 

            The committee recommends that a Senior Citizens Group should be organized, either within town government or through an independent organization to increase monitoring of those living alone or in isolation.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN

SCHEDULE:  WITHINT SIX MONTH OF PLAN ACCEPTANCE

COST:  $300 (ADVERTISING AND MAILING COSTS)

 

15.  GENERAL TOWN GOVERNMENT

 

The town shall maintain an effective and efficient town government.

 

The committee recommends:

 

a.       The town should combine all town ordinances, general operating procedures, fees, applications, permits and usage rules, building rules, gravel pit rules, waste disposal regulations, and appeals procedures into one document to simplify town administration.  It should be internally consistent in definitions across all documents.

 

b.      The Planning Board should draw up a priority list of local highway repairs and projects for the Selectmen’s approval and submission to the DOT.  It is suggested that the Town Hall area, the Route 184/204 intersection, be given priority.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  a.  ADMINISTRATIVE ASS’T AND PLANNING BOARD, b. AS INDICATED

SCHEDULE:  OVER NEXT TWO YEARS

COST: $1000 PRINTING COSTS

 

16. EDUCATION

 

The town shall provide for education in the community.

 

The committee recommends that the Town Selectmen and the Budget Committee meet with the Lamoine School Committee at some time not in the budget process to discuss the long-range expectations of the School Committee as to future problems of the system.  The School Committee should be asked to provide, as possible, projections of the local school population and projections of the Union population that may have an impact on local financial planning.

 

IMPLEMENTATION RESPONSIBILITY:  SELECTMEN AND SCHOOL BOARD

SCHEDULE:  PRIOR TO NEXT BUDGET CONSTRUCTION

COST:  THE ANNUAL SCHOOL BUDGET SHOULD INCLUDE $500 FOR SCHOOL BOARD PLANNING.

 


 

APPENDICES

 


APPENDIX 1

School Population Predictions

 

            The Lamoine school population has been quite stable over the past ten years but this stability is very deceptive since it represents several factors changing and canceling each other.  The population of the town has grown but the growth has been by the addition of more older family groups with fewer children entering the local system.

            In 1980, the population was 953 residents and the school population was 204 students.  This represented a student production of 224 students for each 1000 people.  In 1990 the population was 1311 people, the student population was 207, and the ratio was 158 students per 1000 residents.  Current enrollment (1992-3) of 241 represents no more than 184 students per 1000 residents.

            We have two population estimates for the year 2000 in our population section:  one around 1800, another around 1500.  All other factors remaining constant, this gives two predictions of the school population in the year 2000, 324 students or 270 students.  These predictions are based on the 1992 best estimates and ignores any population change after 1990 so they are biased somewhat to the high side.  If our population inmigration becomes even older than it is now, this prediction would be too high.  If the new people moving in are younger, this estimate will be too low.  If the birth rate rises and family size increases in the next decade, this estimate will be too low.

            In the face of such uncertainty, it is difficult to accurately plan ahead in this area.  A census of pre-schoolers would be helpful but would only represent the existing base not the effect of the inmigrant families.  Since birth rates change, it might pick up surges in population from this factor and give a slight lead-time, picking up those newcomers with pre-schoolers.  A rolling prediction based on this type datum would provide some warning and might give two years lead-time.

            The most important three items in setting policy in the town school budget are:

 

1.      State aid formula changes which, on a year by year basis will change local dollar requirements

2.      State school construction aid competition which will set a limit, outside our control, on building new facilities.

3.      The town’s standards for class size which will set the time frame for another portable addition.  Grades will not, uniformly, be average and some will exceed the desirable size.  Handling this problem will be difficult over the coming decade even with the best of luck.  With uniform distribution 13 grades and 324 students the average class size would be 25 students/room, 270 students would be 21 students.


Enrollment, Lamoine, 1984-1991

 

 

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Total

1984 Pupils

11

13

10

18

16

15

14

22

15

135

Percent of total

8

10

7

13

12

11

10

16

11

 

1985 Pupils

21

14

10

13

22

13

13

12

20

138

Percent of total

15

10

7

9

16

9

9

9

14

 

1986 Pupils

28

13

7

11

14

19

13

12

13

132

Percent of total

21

10

5

8

10

14

10

9

10

 

1987 Pupils

19

27

15

8

14

13

22

12

13

144

Percent of total

13

19

10

6

10

9

15

8

9

 

1988 Pupils

16

19

27

18

9

13

15

22

12

151

Percent of total

11

13

18

12

6

9

10

15

8

 

1989 Pupils

24

17

21

27

21

12

11

18

23

175

Percent of total

14

10

12

15

12

7

6

10

13

 

1990 Pupils

17

18

15

18

25

14

9

12

17

145

Percent of total

12

12

10

12

17

10

6

8

12

 

1991 Pupils

22

19

18

18

20

28

15

12

13

165

Percent of total

13

12

11

11

12

17

9

7

8

 

 

Total pupils 1984-91

 

 

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Total Pupils

Total Pupils

158

140

123

131

141

127

112

122

126

1180*

Percent of total

13

12

10

11

12

11

9

10

11

 

Mean class size

20

18

15

16

18

16

14

15

16

 

Median size

20

18

15

18

18

14

14

12

15

 

 

*(1185 is the actual total including all special categories not assigned to specific grades and these do not appear in the class total)


 

In the table below each row is a separate class from entry as kindergarten students till they reach grade 8 showing the changes in class size.

 

Entry

Year

Number in Group at Each Grade

Change overall

 

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

 

1980

 

 

 

 

16

13

13

12

12

-4

1981

 

 

 

18

22

19

22

22

23

+5

1982

 

 

10

13

14

13

15

18

17

+7

1983

 

13

10

11

14

13

11

12

13

0

1984

11

14

7

8

9

12

9

12

 

+1

1985

21

13

15

18

21

14

15

 

 

-6

1986

28

27

27

27

25

28

 

 

 

0

1987

19

19

21

18

20

 

 

 

 

-1

1988

16

17

15

18

 

 

 

 

 

+2

1989

21

18

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

-3

1990

17

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

+1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

+2

 

Largest class change in one year –7

Largest increase in any class overall +7

 

Classes followed, grade-by-grade, as they move through the system, using the eight-year sample period, gave the following results.

 

1.      The total change in size within a class, as the class moved upward from their entry into the table towards the eighth grade, was +2, in a base of 1180 students, which means that class size was essentially unchanged and that the best predictor of the eighth grade size is the kindergarten size that it had on entry into school.

2.      The town population went up by about 30% during this period but this did not seem to change class size so, probably, most students coming into town were pre-schoolers who combined with the already resident pre-schoolers and were detected only on entry to the school system.

3.      There is a weak trend for the grade 4-6 transition to mark a slight decrease in class size.  This may mean there is a slow creep upwards occurring that our numbers are too few to register clearly or that, demographically, perhaps, young families give up rentals or living with parents or sell their homes and change their residency at this time to other school districts.


 

HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT

 

Year

EHS

MDI

Sumner

Other

Total

84

60

11

1

0

72

85

46

8

1

0

55

86

62

6

0

0

72

87

63

10

2

0

75

88

52

6

0

0

58

89

50

7

0

0

57

90

51

11

1

3

66

91

43

16

0

3

62

 


 

APPENDIX 2

 

HOUSING NEED ANALYSIS

 

1.  Housing Need

 

a)

Number of households, occupied units

501

1a

*plus b)

1.5% for undoubling

7.5

1b

*plus c)

5.0% for vacancies

25

1c

Is d)

HOUSING NEED

533

1d

 

2.  Housing Supply

 

a)

Number of housing units (yr rd)

546

2a

Minus b)

Dilapidated or unusable (5%)

25

2b

Is c)

USABLE HOUSING SUPPLY

521

2c

 

3.  Net Units Needed (1d minus 2c)                                          12        3

 

4.

 

a)

Substandard-plumbing  **

0

4a

b)

Overcrowded, excluding units in 4a **

0

4b

c)

Total substandard**

 

 

 

** vacancy rate exceeds 5% by greater than estimated substandard.  Substandard were included in our calculation for 2b so category not valid as an independent sub-set in this case.

 

5.  New Housing Need                                                             12***

 

*** annual construction rate runs at this level

 

*an estimate of housing units with more than one family or household living therein.  The 5% vacancy rate is the amount usually assumed to provide some choice in the marketplace.  Whether either is truly meaningful in rural Downeast Maine is untested.

 

 


APPENDIX 3

 

A.  INVERTEBRATES OF LAMOINE BEACH

 

            The following is a survey of the invertebrates found at Lamoine Beach done by a University of Maine Ecology Class on September 14, 1974.

 

PRELIMINARY INFORMATION AND COMMENTS

            Transects were arranged in numerical order.  Transect 1 was located approximately halfway between the parking lot and the large rocky point.  Station 1 in each transect was highest in the intertidal zone.  Station three was closest to the water at the low tide line.  Sieve #5 retains particles 4 mm in diameter and larger while sieve #18 retains particles 1mm and larger.  Water temperature measured near the island was 14 degrees C.

 

In the list of organisms, station-by-station, for each screening team, all the numbers are expressed as “number of organisms per sample”.

 

DATA

While no intact lugworms (Arenicola marina: Annelida, Polychaeta) were collected numerous recent burrows were present in the intertidal mud and sand.

TEAM A

SCREEN TEAM 1

            Station 1:  muddy sand, substrate temperature 17 C

            Station 2:  fine sand, sub temp 16C

            Station 3:  fine sand, sub temp 17C

Note: Virtually all of the sediment retained by the sieves at all stations consisted of the sand tubes of the polychaeteus annelids, Clymenella torquata (family Maldanidae) and an unidentified ­Spionidae.

 

+ means abundant, ++very abundant, +++extremely abundant, - absent

 

ORGANISMS

STATION 1

STATION 2

STATION 3

Phylum Annelida

  Family Malanidae

    Clymenella torquata

++

+

+

Family Spionidae

+++

+

+

Family Glyceridae

   Glycera dibranchiata

1

-

++

Family Arenicolidae

  Arenicola marina

-

1

-

Phylum Mollusca

  Class Gastrapoda

    Lora cancellata

++

2

1

    Littorina littorea

++

1

-

Class Pelecypoda

  Ensis directus

-

1

1

  Mya arenaria

-

-

1

      Many siphons apparent but organisms below the sampling depth

Phylum Arthropoda

Class Crustacea

    Gammarus sp.

-

+

-

    Idotea balthica

-

-

2

Phylum Echinoidea

    Echinarchnius parma

-

1

-

 

SCREEN TEAM 2

            Station 1- Gravel, Air temp 21C, sed. Temp 16.5 C, mean sediment weight (total) 959 grams (82% in screen 5, 58% in screen 18), mean number of organisms per sample 272.

            Station 2- Fine sand, air temp 20.5 C, sed temp 17C, mean sed weight (total) 47 gms, mean organisms per sample 49

            Station 3- Shell debris, air temp 21 c, sed temp 16.5 C, mean sed wt (total) 998 gms (22% screen 5, 78% screen 18), mean number organism per sample 19

 

ORGANISMS

STATION 1

STATION 2

STATION 3

Phylum Nemertea

  Species A

1

-

-

  Species B

-

-

1

    Cerebratulus sp

-

-

1

Phylum Annelida

  Class Polychaeta

   Family Nephtyidae

1

-

-

   Family Spionidae

2

5

-

Family Glyceridae

   Glycera dibranchiata

-

1

1

Family Malanidae

   Clymenella torquata

-

28

11

UNIDENTIFIED Polychaetes

1

4

1

Phylum Mollusca

  Class Gastropoda

    Littorina littorea

13

2

2

    L. obtusata

1

-

1

    L saxatilis

1

-

-

    Lunatia heros

2

2

-

    Buccinum undatum

1

1

-

    Thais lapillus

1

-

-

Class Pelecypoda

     Mytilus edulis

135

1

-

     Mya arenaria- many juveniles in fine sand below sampling depth


 


Phylum Arthropoda

    Class Crustacea

     Unidentified Isopoda

-

1

-

    Gammarus sp.

69

3

-

     Crangon septemspinosa

-

2

1

    Balanus sp

41

-

-

 

SEARCH TEAM (transect on sand and mud beach)

 

Phylum Nemertea

            Cerebratulus sp. Abundant in muddy sand

Phylum Annelida

            Class Polychaeta

                        Family Arenicolidae

                                    Arenicola marina, lugworm, abundant in muddy sand

                        Family Maldanidae

                                    Clymenella torquata, bamboo worm, abundant in sand

                        Family Glyceridae

                                    Glycera dibranchiata, blood worm abundant in sand and mud

                        Family Polynoidae

                                    Lepidonotus sp., a scale worm, scarce in mud

Phylum Mollusca

            Class Amphineura

                                    Trachydermon ruber, the red chiton, scarce, attached to rock

           

            Class Gastropoda

                                    Littorina littorea, common periwinkle, abundant on rocks in high intertidal zone

­                                    Thais lapillus, dog whelk, scarce in low intertidal zone

                                    Acmaea testudinalis, limpet, scarce on rocks, in low intertidal zone

            Class Pelecypoda

                                    Mytilus edulis, blue mussel, large beds both high and low intertidal zones, on rocks and gravel

                                    Ensis directus, razor clam, scarce, buried in the mud

                                    Mya arenaria, soft shell clam, abundant in mud

 

Phylum Arthropoda

            Class Crustacea

                                    Balanus balanoides, common rock barnacle, abundant on rocks, low inter-tidal

                                    Balanus balanus, ivory barnacle, abundant on rocks, low intertidal

                                    Gammarus sp., amphipods, abundant in high intertidal pools

                                    Crangon septemspinosa, sand shrimp, abundant in shallow water

                                    Carcinus maenas, little green shore crab, in water and rocks

                                    Cancer irroratus, rock crab, in the water

 

 

Phylum Echinodermata

            Class Echinoidea

                        Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, green sea urchin, abundant in the water and low intertidal

                        Echinarachnius parma, sand dollar, low intertidal on sand

            Class Asteroidea

                        Asterias vulgaris, common starfish, abundant in the water

            Class Holothuroidea

                        Leptosynaptia sp, sea cucumbers, on mud in water

 

WATER SEARCH TEAM

(searched the water at the end of the rocky point and pools among these rocks)

 

Phylum Porifera

            Encrusting sponges were found attached to gravel but were sparse

Phylum Nemertea

            Amphiporus angualatus, red nemertean, under rocks, sparse

            Lineus ruber, the green nemertean, under rocks sparse

            Lineus socialis, small coiled nemertean, under rocks, abundant*

 

Phylum Annelida

            Class Polychaeta

                        Family Polynoidae

                                    Lepidonotus sp., scaleworm, abundant under rocks

                        Family Terebellidae

                                    Amphitrite sp., sparse, anchored to sand under rocks

                        Family Serpulidae

                                    Spirorbis borealis, sparse, attached to sea grass

 

Phylum Mollusca

            Class Amphineura

                        Tracydermon ruber, chiton, clinging to rocks

            Class Gastropoda

                        Acmaea testudinalis,  limpet, common on rocks

                        Buccinum undatum, waved whelk, abundant on rocks

            Class Pelcypoda

                        Mytilis edulis, blue mussel, in clumps on bottom

                        Modiolus modiolus, horse mussel, abundant in the bottom

                        Hiatella artica, red-necked clam, common among rocks sub-tidal

 

Phylum Arthropoda

            Class Crustacea

                        Idotea balthica, isopod, common in marine vegetation

                        Pagarus pubescens, hermit crab, crawling on rock in water, sparse

                        Gammarus sp., amphipod, common

 

Phylum Echinodermata

            Class Ophiuroidea

                        Ophiopholis aculeata, brittle star, common under rocks

            Class Asteroidea

                        Henrici sanguinolenta, blood star, sparse on submerged rocks

            Class Holothuroidea

                        Cucumaria frondosum, brown fringed sea cucumber, abundant under rocks

            Class Echinoidea

                        Strongylocentratus droebachensis, green sea urchin, abundant on bottom

 

Two additional teams did the beach but only the following additions to the above listing were found:

 

Phylum Cnidaria

            Class Arthozoa

                        Metridium senile, sea anemone on rock under water below tide line

Phylum Chordata

            Class Ascidacea

                        Unidentified sea squirt on rock below tide line

Phylum Arthropoda

            Class Pycnogonida

                        Unidentified sea spider, under rock below tide line

            Class Crustacea

                        Hyas araneus, toad crab, common sub tidal among rocks

 

Not found but known from other sources are the lobster, several scallop types, the clamworm, the ten-lined whelk, numerous nudibranchs, Macoma baltica, tube anemones, Lion’s mane jellyfish, occasionally an arctic crab.

 

B.  BIRDS OF LAMOINE

 

Arctic Loon

Common Loon

Horned Grebe

Red-Necked Grebe

Great Cormorant

Double Crested Cormorant

American Bittern

Great Blue Heron

Canada Goose

Wood Duck

American Black Duck

Mallard

Greater Scaup

Common Eider

King Eider

Oldsquaw

Black Scoter

Surf Scoter

White-winged Scoter

Common Goldeneye

Barrow’s Goldeneye

Bufflehead

Common Merganser

Red-breasted Merganser

Ruddy Duck

Osprey

Bald Eagle

Northern Harrier

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Broad-winged Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Rough-legged Hawk

American Kestrel

Merlin

Peregrine Falcon

Gyrfalcon

Spruce Grouse

Ruffed Grouse

Black-bellied Plover

Lesser Golden Plover

Semi-palmated Plover

Killdeer

Greater Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Spotted Sandpiper

Ruddy Turnstone

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Common Snipe

American Woodcock

Laughing Gull

Wood Thrush

American Robin

Gray Catbird

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Water Pipit

Cedar Waxwing

European Starling

Solitary Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Tennessee Warbler

Nashville Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

Pine Warbler

Bay-Breasted Warbler

Black and White Warbler

Hooded Warbler

Northern Waterthrush

Common Yellowthroat

Canada Warbler

Northern Cardinal

Rufous-sided Towee

Chipping Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Fox Sparrow

Lincoln’s Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

Bobolink

Common Tern

Saw-whet Owl

Bonaparte’s Gull

Ring-billed gull

Herring Gull

Iceland Gull

Glaucous Gull

Great Black-backed Gull

Rock Dove

Mourning Dove

Black-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Great Horned Owl

Barred Owl

Short-eared Owl

Whip-poor-will

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downey Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Black-backed Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Wood Peewee

Alder Flycatcher

Least Flycatcher

Eastern Phoebe

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Kingbird

Horned Lark

Tree swallow

Barn Swallow

Gray Jay

Blue jay

American Crow

Common Raven

Black-capped Chickadee

Boreal Chickadee

Red-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Brown Creeper

House Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird

Veery

Gray-cheeked Thrush

Swainson’s Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Eastern Meadowlark

Rusty Blackbird

Common Grackle

Brown-headed Cowbird

Northern Oriole

Pine Grosbeak

Purple Finch

Common Redpoll

Pine Siskin

American Goldfinch

Evening Grosbeak

Northern Parula

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Cape May Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Black-throated green Warbler

Palm Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

American Redstart

Ovenbird

Mourning Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler

Scarlet Tanager

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

American Tree Sparrow

Field Sparrow

Sharp-tailed Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

Snow Bunting

Red-winged Blackbird

Ring-necked Pheasant

Indigo Bunting

 

            While some of these birds are rare in Lamoine, all have been seen by competent local birders.  Further contributions are welcomed.

 

APPENDIX 4

HOUSEHOLD SURVEY—TOWN OF LAMOINE—91

THIS SURVEY IS NECESSARY TO MEET THE STATE’S REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING.  ANSWERING IS TOTALLY VOLUNTARY.  SKIP QUESTIONS YOU FEEL ARE INAPPROPRIATE OR THAT YOU PREFER TO OMIT.  PLEASE DO NOT PUT YOUR NAME ON THIS SHEET.  SOMEONE WILL PICK IT UP IN THE NEXT FEW DAYS.  IF WE MISS YOU FOR PICKUP, PLEASE DROP IT IN THE BOX PROVIDED AT THE TOWN OFFICE.  CIRCLE THE LETTER NEXT TO YOUR RESPONSE OR PUT A CHECK IN THE BOX OR SPACE CLOSEST TO YOUR ATTITUDE.

                                                            THANKS FOR YOUR HELP.

 

1.      This household lives in Lamoine as

A.     local residents

B.     seasonal visitors

 

2.      We are located

A.     in the shore zone (within 250 ft of the water)

B.     not in the shore zone

 

3.      Our home is

A.     a single mobile home unit

B.     a double mobile home unit

C.     a single family house

D.     a duplex (2 family unit)

E.      a multi-unit apartment unit

 

4.      We

A.     rent the unit

B.     own the unit

 

5.      Where do the adults in this household work?  Indicate number who work in each town.

Lamoine           _____

Ellsworth          _____

M.D.I.              _____

Bangor             _____

Other locales --- Write in town and number working there.

            Town_________________     number_______

            Town_________________     number_______

 

If you have been in Lamoine less than ten years, please answer the following questions 6 through 9, otherwise go to question 10.

 

 

6.      We moved here, mainly, because

A.     Its convenient to where we work

B.     The cost of housing made it affordable

C.     We like woods and sea

D.     The school system was attractive

E.      The small town is attractive

F.      We had a family connection

G.     Taxes were reasonable

OTHER___________________________________________________________

 

7.      Our secondary reason was

A.     Its convenient to where we work

B.     The cost of housing made it affordable

C.     We like woods and sea

D.     The school system was attractive

E.      The small town is attractive

F.      We had a family connection

G.     Taxes were reasonable

OTHER___________________________________________________________

 

8.      We moved here from

A.     MDI/BAR HBR region

B.     ELLSWORTH area

C.     BANGOR area

D.     Elsewhere Downeast (  HANCOCK OR WASHINGTON CTYS)

Write town in here ______________________________

E.      Elsewhere in MAINE

Write town in here______________________________

F.      N.H. OR VT.

G.     MASS., CONN., OR R.I.

H.     N.Y. OR N.J.

I.        Other state or country

Write in here___________________________________

 

9.      At the time of moving to Lamoine, our family could be best described as

A.     Retirees or near retirees

B.     Family with most children in college or on their own

C.     Family with most children in school or college

D.     Family with most children preschool or in early grades

E.      Young family with no children in the household

F.      Mature adults with no children in the household

G.     Single adults

H.     Other

Specify____________________________________

 

EVERYONE PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING, IF THEY APPLY TO YOUR HOUSEHOLD

 

10.  For elementary education we plan to use

A.     public schools

B.     private schools

C.     home schooling

D.     undecided

E.      doesn’t apply to us

 

11.  We favor

A.     present policy of tuitioning students to area high schools

B.     constructing a Union 92 High School

C.     no opinion

 

12.  I would like to see the Lamoine School library opened for children’s use in the summer

A.     One day per week

B.     Several days a week

C.     Not at all

D.     No opinion

I would volunteer to help staff it.  Check here____

 

13.  Do you use the Ellsworth Library?

A.     No

B.     Occasionally

C.     A lot

 

14.  Do you favor an Ellsworth bypass?

A.     Yes

B.     No

C.     Not needed yet

D.     No opinion

 

15.  If an Ellsworth bypass is constructed across Lamoine, do you want commercial development on it?

A.     Encouraged

B.     Regulated

C.     Minimized

D.     Prevented

E.      No opinion


 

For next set of questions use letters on the map to indicate areas

 

16.  Which area of town do you think is most likely to be commercially developed for retail sales in the next ten years

Most likely                               ______

Next most likely                        ______

None will be developed            ______

No Opinion                              ______

COMMENTS______________________________________________________

 

17.  Which area, if any, should be open to retail development?

A.     Absolutely none

B.     Smallest area compatible with state’s mandates

C.     Most of the town

D.     All of the town

E.      A suitable and adequate area of the town

F.      No opinion

 

18 a.  If some area(s) must be open to commercial development, if you wish, indicate the areas you would prefer it to be.__________

            No opinion________________

            COMMENTS______________________________________________________

 

18 b. Is there some area(s) of town that should be protected from commercial development?  Protection needed for area(s)_______________

                        No Opinion_________

                        COMMENTS________________________________________________

 

Town ordinances and services

 

                        Too permissive adequate          too restrictive                no opinion

Building Code   ______                        ______            _________                  ________

Shoreland

Zoning              ______                        ______            _________                  ________

Gravel Pit

Ordinance        ______                        ______            _________                  ________

 

Suggestions

 

 

19.  Should the Selectmen look into an ordinance to regulate noise?

                        Yes____          No____           No Opinion____          Not necessary____

 

 

 

20.  Should the town create a Financial Planning Committee to study the long-term expenditures of the town?

 

Yes____          No____           No Opinion____          Not necessary____

 

21.    Town Hall hours

a.       Keep same hrs

b.      Rearrange hrs

c.       Reduce hrs

d.      Open for longer hours

 

Suggestions________________________________________________________

 

22.    Town Dump – When the Town Landfill closes, the town will probably have to go to PERC.  At the moment there are no other options.  When the landfill closes, do you want to

a.       Build a Transfer Station at the dump site

b.      Build a transfer station at some other site. (such as__________________)

c.       Arrange a Regional Transfer Station with some other towns

d.      Provide household pickup on town roads and truck directly to PERC

e.       No opinion

 

23.    In any event, to reduce volume and thus PERC costs, Lamoine should

a.       Continue recycling efforts as is

b.      Increase recycling efforts

c.       Require recycling by everyone using Landfill or whatever collection system is finally devised

Suggestions________________________________________________________

 

24.    Are you satisfied with the way the Town Roads have been maintained?

 

Yes____          No____           No Opinion____         

 

            Comments_________________________________________________________

 

25.    Should the town spend more money on the town roads?

Yes____          No____           No Opinion____

 

26.    Are you satisfied with snow-plowing on town roads?  (Note rte 184 and 204 are not included in this question since they are State Roads and we have no control over their plowing)

a.       Yes

b.      No

c.       No opinion

Suggestions________________________________________________________

 

TOWN PARKS

 

 

Needs

Expansion

Needs

Improvement

Keep

As is

Reduce

Funding

27.

Lamoine Beach

 

 

 

 

28.

Bloomfield Park

   (Blunt’s Pond)

 

 

 

 

29.

Marlboro Beach

   (access lot)

 

 

 

 

 

Suggestions______________________________________________________________

 

30.    Have you had any problems with your well?

a.       Yes

b.      No

Type problem_____________________________________

 

30.    Do you want a clam restoration project developed

a.       Yes, enough to pay for it

b.      Yes, if cost is minimal

c.       No

d.      No opinion

Comments_____________________________________________________

 

WHAT SHOULD LAMOINE’S POLICY BE ON THE FOLLOWING

 

Housing Types

Promote

Allow

Discourage

No Opinion

Multi-Family

 

 

 

 

Condominiums

 

 

 

 

Single Family

 

 

 

 

Duplex

 

 

 

 

Mobile homes

 

 

 

 

Mobile Home Parks

 

 

 

 

Low Income Housing

 

 

 

 

Elderly Units

 

 

 

 

 

Retail/Service

Promote

Allow

Discourage

No Opinion

Convenience Stores

 

 

 

 

Shopping Mall

 

 

 

 

Hotels, Motels, Inns

 

 

 

 

Restaurants

 

 

 

 

Bed & Breakfasts

 

 

 

 

Recreational Campsites

 

 

 

 

Professional Offices

 

 

 

 

Nursing Homes

 

 

 

 

Retirement Villages

 

 

 

 

Business/Industry

Promote

Allow

Discourage

No Opinion

Heavy Industry

 

 

 

 

Sand/Gravel Extraction

 

 

 

 

Home Business

 

 

 

 

Concrete Plant

 

 

 

 

Shellfish Processing

 

 

 

 

Fish Processing

 

 

 

 

Agriculture

 

 

 

 

Forestry

 

 

 

 

 

Should Lamoine protect any of the following from development?

 

 

Yes

No

No Strong Feelings

Access to Shore

 

 

 

Wildlife Habitats

 

 

 

Historic Sites/Blds

 

 

 

Wetlands

 

 

 

Steep Slopes

 

 

 

Groundwater Supply

 

 

 

Scenic Areas

 

 

 

 

If you have any comments, please put them on the back of the last page ----- thanks again for your help.

 

RESULTS B

(totals only for each question, further breakdown on file in the Town Hall) (Compiled from original sheet, but not in same format)

 

Results of Household Questionnaire.

264 Households responded.  All comments have been noted and passed to relevant town officers for their attention.  Thanks for your frank replies.  The following is a summary of the responses.

 

Questionnaires were returned from the following number of households.

 

Local Residents

219

 

 

Seasonal

34

Misc #

11

 

Total

Shore Own

Interior Own

All types

34

All Types

11

Old Timers

116

22

94

 

 

 

 

Newcomers

103

24

65

Rent-14

 

 

 

Number in Group

264

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Percent

Single Mobile

13

Double Mobile

2

Single House

80

Duplex

2

Apartment

2

 

Work Locale**

Percent

Reason for Moving Here***

 

Reason for Moving

Here (secondary)***

 

Lamoine

20

Work Convenience

9

Work Convenience

12

Ellsworth

37

Affordable

15

Affordable

9

Trenton

2

Woods/Sea

31

Woods/Sea

25

MDI

24

Schools

6

Schools

5

Bangor

5

Small Town

12

Small Town

25

Orono

1

Family Connection

17

Family Connection

9

Hancock

1

Low Taxes

7

Low Taxes

15

Blue Hill

1

Other

4

Other

 

Widely

4

 

 

 

 

Other

5

 

 

 

 

**percent of those indicating employment

***percent of those giving reasons

 

## unless indicated % is percent of entire group

#misc. is low number grps, late submissions, and errors in filling out forms

 

Percent moved here from

**

At that time

**

MDI Region

20

Ret/Near Ret

26

Ellsworth

14

Fam Mostly Old

5

Bangor Area

11

Fam High Grades

15

Han/Wash Cty

18

Fam Low Grades

21

Other Maine

5

Yng Fam No Child

5

VT/NH

4

Mat Adults

20

Mass/Conn/RI

16

Singles

8

Other US

15

 

 

** percent of respondents

 

Elementary Education

Use Planned

 

High School Favor

 

Public

22

Present Policy

55

Private

0

Union 92 School

5

Home Schooling

1

No Opinion

29

Undecided

1

 

 

Doesn’t Apply

52