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Historical Notes from 2005 Town Report

The historical notes in the 2005 Town Report are courtesy of Marion McFarland, Lamoine Historical Society.
A school master once scolded Oscar Ford for being mischievous. He told him he was an “intolerable, incorrigible, insubordinate youth engaged in pre meditated mischief.
1945 was the first year the Town of Lamoine transported students to High School. To ride, one had to purchase a $1.25 ticket that was punched each ride.
Electric lights became available at Lamoine Corner on December 26, 1924 and then spread out to the other sections of town.
In 1870 Lamoine was the center of the Grand Banks Fishing Industry. It is said that more acreage was covered with fish spread on flakes than anywhere in the country.

In 1883 Lamoine voted to build a town hall. The bid was $1,161

In 1889 Asa Hodgkins and others formed a company to cut ice at Blunt's Pond. A sluice was built from the pond down Asa's Lane to the shore where a vessel anchored to load the ice bound for foreign ports.
1958 At the annual Lamoine Town Meeting Mrs. Eunice F. Young was elected Town Clerk for the 37th consecutive year.

1870 you could send a letter for 2-cents, a postcard for 1-cent. The men paid a poll tax and at least part of their property tax could be paid by “work on roads”.

June 1791 – Madame LaVal landed at what is now known as Lamoine. She came ashore in mall attire, probably being the first woman to ever wear knickers in America .

J. Sherman Douglas was disappointed when President Harding turned down his offer to use Shore Acres as the Summer White House. Douglas believed Lamoien Beach was the most beautiful place in Maine .

(From Arthur Renolds Diary-1905): The Coaling Station “We rowed around The Maine , The Massachusetts , The Alabama , The Kearsage, The Missouri , The Kentucky and The Illinois . The Iowa took 1,000 tons of coal. We have 6,000 men on board these vessels.